Emotion, Motivation, Stress.doc

5 define the field of describe the kinds of questions

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5. Define the field of " psychoneuroimmunology ." Describe the kinds of questions a psychoneuroimmunologist might try to study. 6. How does problem-focused coping (or primary control) compare with emotion- focused coping (or secondary control)? ________________________________________________________________________ L ECTURE E XERCISE A NSWER K EY True/False 1. 0 The sympathetic nervous system mobilizes the body's resources to deal with emergencies or strenuous activity. 2. + The lateral hypothalamus, by contrast, provides neural signals that lead to the initiation of eating behavior. 3. 0 People do not always show on their faces the emotions they feel inside. They conform to social rules called display rules, which govern how to appropriately express emotion in social situations. 4. 0 This person is showing the display rule of neutralizing. Maximizing involves enhancing the expression of an emotion that one truly feels. 5. 0 This person is showing primary control (they are also showing an internal locus of control). Short Answer 6. The experience of stress is most overwhelming when (a) stresses are chronic or long-term (such as enduring health or financial problems), (b) when multiple stresses occur simultaneously (such as divorce occurring in the context of financial and work- related difficulties), and (c) a person is socially isolated (such as having few or no friends to turn to for support). 7. The primary emotions include happiness, fear, anger, surprise, disgust, and sadness (some researchers also include pride). The primary emotions are deeply-rooted our biological heritage, emerge early in life, and are probably universal. In these ways, they contrast with secondary emotions. 8. The physiological processes that regulate hunger involve the hypothalamus, which monitors fat content, blood sugar levels, and stomach signals related to eating. 4
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Based on these internal cues concerning the body's nutritional needs, either the lateral hypothalamus will cause eating activity to begin, or the ventromedial hypothalamus will cause eating activity to stop. The psychological factors related to the regulation of eating include cultural norms of consumption, body type, and one's current emotional state and metabolism. 9. Some examples of body-mind interrelationships include (a) how drugs alter physiological functioning and, as a result, psychological functioning (such as the pleasant or unpleasant mood states associated with alcohol consumption), (b) how fluctuations in naturally occurring blood-sugar levels (associated with eating) affect psychological
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