This assessment consisted of 28 different questions

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Survey also known as WAS (Kear, Coffman, McKenna & Ambrosio, 2000). This assessment consisted of 28 different questions about writing where thestudents score how they feel about the question being asked. E.C. would score herself using pictures of Garfield in four different facial expressions that communicated feelings. She would do this by circling the feeling in accordance to how they feel about the question being asked. Completing this assessment gave me a good indication of how E.C. felt about writing, as this lesson has writing components. In week three of this course, I used areading assessment on E.C. which was called the Elementary Reading Attitude Survey (ERAS), which is similar to my assessment I used in this lesson (McKenna & Kear, 1990). I already had a good indication of how E.C. feels about reading, so I decided to assess how she feels about writing this time. The cognitive assessment I completed was the Oral Reading Assessment (Reutzel & Cooter, 2016). This assessment is an oral retelling knowledge of narrative text structure (Reutzel & Cooter, 2016). Since I was aware that E.C. had already read Anne of Green Gables, I used the same book for the assessment. I asked E.C. to tell me what happened in her own words about the setting, problems in the story and resolution (Reutzel & Cooter, 2016). As E.C. retold the story, I was scoring her on the score sheet. I was able to promote E.C.’s literacy strategic processing and metacognitionwhen I got her to think about what she had read before reading the picturebook version of the story. Once we read the picture book version of the story, E.C. was able to show me her favourite part of the chapters by creating a story quilt piece. This activity will continue as I continue to work with E.C. on her reading development. Students’ can improve their comprehension in language arts when they write about what they read (Graham & Herbert, 2010). Students’ will improve their reading and comprehension when they learn the skills to create their own text (Graham & Herbert, 2010). Students’ comprehension is also improved by increasing how often they produce their own text, as writing is just as important as Walden University Richard W. Riley College of Education and LeadershipPage 6
MSED Literacy Activityreading (Graham & Herbert, 2010). E.C. was also asked to create her story cards that described a major event within the story; each major event in the story will get a story card. This part of the lesson will also continue the next time we work together, as this time, we only focused on chapters one and two. These two writing activities were an excellent way to show evidence on how E.C. is comprehending what she is reading. During the lesson I made observations which helped me gained informationon E.C. This made me believe the lesson was practical. E.C. was able to retell the book and think about major events and her favourite part of the chapters. E.C. was able to use her writing skills to finish the tasks in today’slesson and add any new vocabulary she learned in the story and add to her story cards and story quilt piece. Invented spelling was used on words that

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture