dection 5Storage Devices.docx

Many motherboards include built in onboard support

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Many motherboards include built-in (onboard) support for RAID. RAID implemented in this way is typically software/driver RAID. Operating system Operating system RAID uses RAID features within the operating system. Like software RAID, the system CPU is used for RAID operations, but performance is typically better than software RAID because of integration with the operating system. Windows 7 supports creating RAID 0 and RAID 1 arrays in Disk Management, but does not support configuring RAID 5 arrays. To use RAID 5 on a client computer, you will need to use hardware or software RAID. The exact process you use to configure RAID depends on your motherboard and/or controller card. The following steps are a typical method for configuring software RAID included on many motherboards: 1. Install the RAID controller card and connect the drives to the controller. 2. If using an onboard RAID controller with SATA drives, edit the CMOS settings and identify the drive type as RAID. This tells the system to load the onboard BIOS/UEFI for accessing the connected drives. 3. Boot the computer. After the system BIOS/UEFI loads, the RAID BIOS will load. Press the key combination displayed to enter the RAID configuration utility (commonly Ctrl + F ). 4. Within the configuration utility, define an array, add disks to the array, and identify the array type (RAID 0, 1, 5, or 10, etc.). o On some controller cards, you can create a RAID 1 set using an existing disk (with data) and a new disk. During the setup, data from the first disk is copied to the second disk. o Some controller cards cannot create mirrored drives using existing data on a drive. If you use drives with existing data, that data will be lost. o Some controller cards let you mirror an existing drive, but only from a utility that runs within the operating system. o When creating new RAID 0 and RAID 5 drives, all existing data on all disks will be lost. 5. Reboot the computer into the operating system and install the drivers for the RAID controller. 6. In Windows, the RAID array appears as a single disk with a partition already defined. Use Disk Management to format the partition and assign it a drive letter. If you want to install the operating system on a RAID array, follow steps 1-4 above, then take the following steps: 1 Reboot the computer from the operating system installation disc. 2 During the first part of the installation, Windows loads the necessary files it needs to start the installation. You will need to manually load the controller driver so that Windows can see the RAID array. You will need to have the drivers on a flash drive. 3 After the drivers are loaded, select the partition that represents the RAID array. The installation process will format the partition and install the operating system.
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