Safe_Design_Manufacture_Import_and_Supply_of_Plant.doc

Further information on human error is included in

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Further information on human error is included in Appendix C . 4.5 Environmental conditions A designer should consider the hazards created by the range of physical, environmental and operational conditions to which plant will be exposed during its life. For example, where moving parts may be exposed to dust which could cause the plant to malfunction, a designer should incorporate effective dust covers into the design. The same is true for extreme heat or cold. A designer should ensure that these hazards are minimised or guarded against. This may require the designer to provide instructions to erectors and installers of plant about the precise positioning of the installation. If an operator is physically uncomfortable in operating the plant this may lead to such problems as inattention, carelessness or fatigue which may in turn result in injury or death. For example a poorly designed workstation or cabin where layout design is not based on ergonomic principles can lead to the problems outlined above. 4.6 Erection and installation A designer should recognise that hazards associated with the erection and installation of plant are identified and eliminated or minimised. For example, poor access to fasteners such as clips and bolt holes may mean that an erector or installer needs to stretch or bend at an unnatural angle. This might result in musculoskeletal injury to the erector or installer. Designers should also design plant so it can be erected or installed safely, for example, so that it will have adequate stability and special supports if these are required, especially if a partly SAFE WORK AUSTRALIA MEMBERS’ MEETING 6 30 SEPTEMBER 2010 PAGE 24 OF 52
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completed structure may be unstable, or be designed into sub-assemblies so that each is more manoeuvrable than if it were a complete assembly. SAFE WORK AUSTRALIA MEMBERS’ MEETING 6 30 SEPTEMBER 2010 PAGE 25 OF 52
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4.7 Maintenance A designer’s responsibility extends to ensuring that maintenance on plant can be undertaken safely. Any reasonably foreseeable hazards with future plant maintenance and repair should be identified and designed out so far as is reasonably practicable. Where a worker is required to maintain operating plant, a designer should ensure: locations for undertaking adjustment, lubrication and maintenance are consciously designed to be outside danger zones. This may be achieved, for example, by placing clearly labelled lubrication points away from moving parts where locations for undertaking maintenance cannot be placed outside danger zones, the design should incorporate interlocks to ensure the plant cannot be activated while work is carried out in these zones safe access, for example walkways and guardrails need to be provided to enable safe maintenance and inspection of plant such as cooling towers or storage silos all relevant information is passed on to the manufacturer for inclusion in the manufacturer’s instructions for maintenance
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