Infants whose mothers had high levels of anxiety

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Infants whose mothers had high levels of anxiety during weeks 12-22 of their pregnancies. Children w/ high blood levels of lead. Children who have had frequent changes of residence, whose parents have divorced, or whose fathers are irresponsible/ antisocial (cause or effect?) be careful with CAUSATION. There is a better reason for that fathers prob have ADHD themselves and passed down gene.
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Consequences of ADHD (if treated, not so much) Poor school grades and conduct. ~20% of students w/ADHD have a concurrent learning disability. ~40-60% of ADHD children develop conduct disorder, delinquency and/or drug abuse.(headed this way if not given treatment or meds) Teenagers with Hyperactive-Impulsive ADHD are much more likely to have traffic accidents, get pregnant, develop an STD, commit arson, or run away from home. ~50 % of imprisoned felons and ~50% of adolescents in juvenile facilities have untreated ADHD. ADHD is an accompaniment to law breaking behavior. Up to 80% of ADHD children retain symptoms through adolescence and beyond. Only about 5% of college students w/ ADHD graduate. What Goes Wrong in ADHD? What Goes Wrong in ADHD? People with ADHD show 3-5 year delays in the growth of neurons, especially in the frontal lobes of the brain (prefrontal last place in brain to grow, don't finish until age 30) These areas are involved in attention, impulse control, and initiation and perception of movement. What Goes Wrong in ADHD? Other Possibilities: What Goes Wrong in ADHD? Other Possibilities: Under-activation of frontal lobes Abnormally low dopamine activity Possible “sensory screen”
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Abnormalities in sensing passage of time 50-90% of ADHD individuals also have at least one of the following bipolar disorder (new pediatric diagnostic fad) conduct disorder depression OCD oppositional defiant disorder specific learning disorder tourettes syndrome phenotype symptomes ADHD Treatments: Medication ADHD Treatments: Medication ~80% of ADHD children are helped by stimulant drugs (may unmask tic disorder/Tourette’s) (Note: stimulants quiet everyone); not addictive when used for ADHD. Insomnia, headache, nausea are a frequent side-effects. These are all controlled drugs: Ritalin, Concerta (methylphenidate), Focalin ( d -methylphenidate) – Ritalin most common ADHD med Adderall (amphetamine) Dexadrine (dextroamphetamine) – Cylert (pemoline; now considered risky because of liver problems) dexadrine vyvanse – metabolized only in GI tract to reduce street commerce.
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