a friend of mine a Mandatory with pronouns In most possessive of constructions

A friend of mine a mandatory with pronouns in most

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a friend of mine . (a) Mandatory with pronouns. In most possessive of -constructions, the use of a noun in the objective case is defensible (see 10.6) and even preferred by some authorities. Not so with personal pronouns: the use of the objective case is always a glaring error. When showing possession with of + a
personal pronoun, always use the pronoun’s absolute-possessive form. Ex.: He was a friend of mine. (Obviously not a friend of me .) Ex.: Telling the truth was never a strong point of yours. (b) To intensify. This construction can have an intensifying connotation, frequently negative, when the prepositional phrase follows a demonstrative pronoun ( this , that , these , those ) and a class noun. Ex.: That boy of hers is always getting into trouble. Ex.: This interrogatory of yours is just a burdensome fishing expedition. Ex.: Who could ever forget that moving speech of his? 10.19 Use the relative pronoun who to refer to people only (although whose may refer to things as well); which to refer to things or animals only; and that to refer to either people or things (or both). (a) “That” with people. While who is often the better choice when referring to people, that is perfectly proper as well, especially when referring to groups of people taken collectively. It is mandatory to use that when referring to people and things combined. Ex.: The senators who had voted against the bill celebrated their victory. 188 Ex.: It was the Senate that killed the bill. Ex.: It was the farm-state Republicans who killed the bill. Ex.: It was a handful of lobbyists and their bankrolls that turned public opinion against the bill. (b) “Which” with things. Do not use which to refer to people; if the clause is nonrestrictive, use who . Ex.: The class of plaintiffs is composed of former customers of the bankrupt company, many of whom lost their entire savings. (Reference to people, so of whom rather than of which .) Ex.: A bloc of East Coast senators who had supported the bill tried to bring it up for another vote. (Reference to people— senators .) Ex.: A bloc of East Coast senators, which had supported the bill, tried to bring it up for another vote. (Reference to a thing— bloc .) Ex.: The Capitol dome, which was built in 1882, will be restored next year. (Reference to a thing.) (c) “Whose” with things. It is permissible to use whose to mean of which . Ex.: The Capitol dome, whose completion was celebrated in 1882, was recently restored. 10.20 For relative pronouns referring to anything other than people, use that to introduce a restrictive clause and which (after a comma) to introduce a nonrestrictive clause.
(a) Restrictive clause. A restrictive (or defining) clause is one that is essential to the meaning of the sentence. In the preceding sentence, for example, the clause that is essential to the meaning of the sentence is essential to the meaning of the sentence, so it is a restrictive clause. It identifies the type of one (clause) that this sentence is about from the universe of all clauses. Use that or who to introduce a restrictive clause, and do not set off the clause from the rest of the sentence by commas, em-dashes, or parentheses.

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