However it should be remembered that if service user trainers are not working

However it should be remembered that if service user

This preview shows page 27 - 29 out of 58 pages.

However it should be remembered that if service user trainers are not working regularly or are new to training the issue of payment can be made problematic by the complexity of the benefits system. Some service users can face the loss of benefits when declaring income from paid work. This is because payment may be viewed as evidence of fitness to work. Unfortunately even doing work on an unpaid basis that might have been paid can effect ‘fitness to work’. Other welfare benefits are reduced if the claimant earns more than a certain amount of money and this may be a disincentive for service users to accept paid work (they may be no better off for having been paid). This is a complex subject and one that is individual to each person. Therefore it is always advisable to seek expert advice from the Citizens Advice Bureau or via a welfare rights advice service. The Standards We Expect project issued letters of contract to each trainer it worked with. These simply explained what each side should expect of the other. They were signed by both the project and the trainer (see appendix 5). CHECKLIST: PAYING THE TRAINERS What is the right amount of money to pay the trainer? Can you find out what other trainers are paid? Could trainers who are service users lose welfare benefits or have money problems because they take part? Where can service users find out more about how payments might affect their benefits? Will you have a written contract with the trainer(s) for the training? 5) Working out a programme for the training Making a Change Page 9
Image of page 27
TOP TIP: You will need a programme for each bit of training. A programme shows what a trainer will do, and when. You should find out what help your trainer needs with this. If there are lots of trainers you could hold a meeting with them. To help trainers in the development of the programme for their workshop the Standards We Expect project arranged a one-day meeting for all the trainers (the project used 14 different trainers in total). The aim of the session was to provide background information and discuss how to deliver the training (see appendix 3 and 4). This meeting enabled the different trainers to meet together and benefit from each other’s experience and perspectives. The trainers were also able to share particular exercises and useful approaches to the training. Afterwards we circulated notes of the meeting including individual trainer’s ideas about how to deliver the sessions, in the form of draft programmes (see appendix 6). The trainers’ fees were set to include their time spent attending this meeting. The cost of trainer’s travel to and from the meeting and related out of pocket expenses were met by the project. Each pair of trainers then devised their own programme for the 2 day workshop.
Image of page 28
Image of page 29

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture