a few days they will both reach the end of the incubation period and know for

A few days they will both reach the end of the

This preview shows page 9 - 10 out of 10 pages.

a few days, they will both reach the end of the incubation period and know for sure whether or not they are infected. On the third day of the operation, Nancy Jaax is awakened by a call from her brother, who tells her that their father is close to death. Nancy considers flying home to see her father but decides that she cannot leave her work in the middle of such an important outbreak. Her father dies later that day, while she is working in the hot area. By late afternoon, the team at the Reston facility has euthanized the last remaining monkey, including the monkey who escaped from Room C. While performing a final sweep of the building, Sergeant Klages discovers the freezer full with dead monkeys. Jerry orders him to leave the monkeys in the hallway for the decontamination team to destroy. With the operation completed, the decontamination team scours the building with formaldehyde gas, effectively killing any remaining traces of the virus. Neither Peter Jahrling nor Tom Geisbert develops any symptoms, and Milton Frantig also is diagnosed with nothing more than a bad flu and released from the hospital. Charged with finding the source of the virus, the C.D.C. identifies a monkey-storage facility in the Philippines as the starting point for the Reston infection. As in Virginia, however, none of the human workers at the facility exhibit symptoms of Ebola. Almost a month after the Reston outbreak, the virus reappears at another monkey facility operated by Hazelton Research Products. The C.D.C. and USAMRIID decide to isolate the facility in order to observe the progress of the virus. The virus travels between rooms through the air ducts and effectively kills the entire monkey population. As before, there are no human casualties. Even an animal caretaker named John Coleus who cuts himself with a contaminated scalpel ends up showing no symptoms of the virus. The USAMRIID later discovers that all four caretakers at the original Reston facility test positive for Ebola Reston. However, the strain is symptomless in humans. "Kitum Cave" (pp. 376-411) In the fourth part of the book, the narrative shifts to the summer of 1993 and the author’s own visit to Mount Elgon and Kitum Cave. At the beginning of his journey, Preston notes that the road he is taking to Mount Elgon is part of the Kinshasa Highway, also known as the “AIDS highway.” The road cuts through the middle of Africa and, as the author recalls from his childhood, was a rarely used dirt road until it was paved in the 1970s. Soon afterward, the AIDS virus started to appear in the towns running parallel to the highway. For the trip to Mount Elgon, Preston hires Robin MacDonald as his guide. A professional hunter and safari guide, MacDonald is unconcerned about the threat of the Marburg virus inside Kitum Cave. He laughingly assures Preston that, if necessary, he will roll Preston up in a tent and drop him off at the entrance to Nairobi Hospital. However, more seriously, MacDonald notes that he has a gallon of bleach in his Land Rover.
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  • Fall '14
  • Marburg virus, monkey house, Nancy Jaax

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