After you have done this place the cards with related

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After you have done this, place the cards with related issues in columns with gaps between the cards. It is helpful to use sticky notes on a large piece of flipchart paper. 2. Create the digraph by examining the cards one by one asking, “What other issues on this digraph are caused or influenced by this issue?” As team members identify issues that are related, draw a one-way arrow from the first issue (the cause) to the second issue (the one influenced by the cause). Do this until all the issues have been discussed. Figure 10-25 Interrelationship Digraph
3. After reviewing the arrows and making needed revisions, count the numbers of arrows pointing to each note, and write the numbers on the notes. 4. Identify the cards with the most arrows as the “key factors.” Experience has shown that there should not be more than 5 to 10 key factors, depending on the issue being discussed. Some cards may have several arrows, but for one reason or another they are not really key factors; these can be dropped from consideration at this point. Boxes with the most outgoing arrows tend to be root causes; those with incoming arrows tend to be performance indicators. 5. Draw a double box around the key factors and brainstorm ways to address these issues. Example 10.8: Interrelationship Digraphs Problem: For the issues relating to sales reference tools in Figure 10-24, team members were interested in knowing what issues had the greatest effects on other issues. This would help them to know where to focus their efforts in coming weeks.
Solution: The cards from the affinity diagram in Example 10.7 were used to identify the relationships between the different issues. For presentation purposes, we only used the cards from the first four columns in the affinity diagram (these were evaluation, support, training, and current information). The relationships were outlined using sticky notes and markers on a large piece of paper. The results, shown in Figure 10-26, reveal that the need for a backup system, training, and keeping the links current were key issues in developing the SRT. The team paid special attention to these aspects of the project. On a larger project, they might have established subteams to monitor these aspects of the project. Figure 10-26 Actual Interrelationship Digraph
Tree Diagrams The tree diagram is useful to identify the steps needed to address the given problem. Figure 10-27 shows a tree diagram. A tree diagram is very similar to
a work breakdown structure used in planning projects. The following steps should be used to complete a tree diagram. Figure 10-27 Tree Diagram 1. Assemble the header cards from the affinity diagram. From these cards, choose the header card that represents the most important issue. 2. Once the goal statement has been determined, ask, “What are the steps required to resolve or achieve this major objective or goal?” 3. Once the major tasks have been identified, move to the next level under each task, and ask for the second level tasks, “What are the steps

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