The Writing Center If you do find that a student needs assistance in writing

The writing center if you do find that a student

This preview shows page 41 - 43 out of 204 pages.

The Writing Center If you do find that a student needs assistance in writing standard English (or in any aspect of writing skills), suggest that the student make an appointment at the Writing Center. Staff can administer private or group tutorials on particular skills, help stu- dents to organize their papers, or help them to revise drafts. Staff at the Center will send you a summary of the work session with the student so that you understand the nature of the student’s work outside of class.
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34 Strategies for Inclusive Teaching Outside the Classroom Office Hours According to a survey conducted by the Higher Education Research Institute in 1994 (as cited in Shea, The Chronicle of Higher Education ) only 19.2% of freshmen said that they frequently had asked a teacher for advice after class in the past year. This statistic suggests that students do not initiate contact with a teacher outside of class, even if they do have a concern. University policy requires that all teaching staff hold regularly scheduled office hours in their departments, yet teachers often complain that they sit in their offices waiting for students to come. You can encourage students to come see you by scheduling informal consultations before the first assignment’s due date. Even if the appointments are optional, by having a sign-up sheet, you send the message that you will be waiting for that individual student. Furthermore, if students have concerns later in the semester, they will be more likely to see you since they have already done this before in a neutral situation. In addition, many students at UNC now have e-mail accounts. Giving the class your e-mail address as well as the e-mail addresses of other students can provide an informal, non-threaten- ing arena outside of class where students can pursue questions or concerns in a more relaxed manner. When and Where to Have Office Hours Because students often are reluctant to visit a teacher’s office to discuss their con- cerns, some UNC teachers have held their office hours in more public places such as coffeehouses or bars, which they thought would provide a more relaxing and infor- mal atmosphere. Although these teachers reported that more students came to see them as a result of holding their office hours in these places, some students avoided meeting their teachers in this situation. Consider, for example, a female student whose male teacher holds office hours in a bar. The teacher has put the student in a situa- tion which may make her feel that she is the object of the teacher’s personal, rather than professional, attention (in addition to undermining the intellectual climate goals for the University). Other well-intentioned teachers have held their office hours in the Black Cultural Center (BCC) hoping that African American students would feel more “at home,” and that other students would explore the BCC, which is open to all students. However well-intentioned, holding office hours in the BCC creates the impression that the teacher favors the African American students over other students.
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