Note an argument is inductively strong or weak in

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NOTE: An argument is inductively strong (or weak) in direct proportion to the likelihood of its conclusion  being true on the assumption that its premisses are true. This means that if the premisses of an inductive argument are true then it is IMPROBABLE that its  conclusion is false. The degree of inductive strength depends entirely on how improbable it is that  the conclusion is false given that the premisses are true. Therefore, inductive arguments can be of  varying degrees of strength ranging from very strong inductive arguments to weak inductive  arguments. The conclusion of an inductive argument asserts more than the premisses. It therefore makes  factual claims which lie beyond what the premisses claim. A denial of the conclusion of an inductive  argument does not lead us to a contradiction since we can descriptive situations in which the  premisses remain true and yet the conclusion is false. A typical example of inductive arguments are the weather forecasts of the meteorological  department. On the basis of the data and information gathered during the day or throughout the  week, they forecast what the whether is likely to be the following day. The forecast certainly ventures beyond what the premisses contain because it refers to a day which has not yet arrived.
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So in evaluating inductive arguments we should try to determine the probability or likelihood of the  conclusion being true if the premisses are all true. If the conclusion is likely to be true if the  premisses are true the we consider the argument to be inductively strong. But if the conclusion is  only slightly supported by the premisses, then we consider the argument to be inductively weak. NOTE: a) Arguments that are deductively invalid can possibly be inductively strong or inductively weak,  depending on the strength of connection between the premisses and the conclusion. b) Arguments that are studied by inductive logic usually proceed from what has been experienced to  what has not been experienced. CONCLUSION For analytical purposes, we have divided arguments into two categories namely, deductive and  inductive. But this poses the danger of understanding the two types as separate and mutually  exclusive. Instead we should understand the two types of arguments as constituting a single, continuous scale  of varying degrees of strength of the link between the premises and the conclusion. We can diagrammatically represent this, relationship thus: Arguments Deductively valid 
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Degrees or inductive strength Worthless From the diagram we notice that deductively valid arguments have the strongest possible link (of  necessity) between the premises and the conclusion. This is followed by the varying degrees of 
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