Though this principle seems clear there are a number

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Though this principle seems clear, there are a number of complications. For example, Mill explicitly  states that "harms" may include acts of omission as well as acts of commission. Thus, failing to  rescue a drowning child counts as a harmful act, as does failing to pay taxes, or failing to appear as  a witness in court. All such harmful omissions may be regulated, according to Mill. By contrast, it  does not count as harming someone if – without force or fraud – the affected individual consents to  assume the risk: thus one may permissibly offer unsafe employment to others, provided there is no  deception involved. (Mill does, however, recognise one limit to consent: society should not permit  people to sell themselves into slavery. In these and other cases, it is important to bear in mind that  the arguments in  On Liberty  are grounded on the principle of Utility, and not on appeals to natural  rights      NOTE    Do only that which you would want others to do unto you” The Golden rule (paraphrased  
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1.43 ACTIVITIES  Students to engage in group discussions, online forums and chats, undertake quizzes and  assignments, attend tutorials and constantly consult with the lecturer. 1.44 FURTHER READING           Bayles, M. D. (1968).  Contemporary Utilitarianism . Anchor Books, Doubleday Duncan B. 2010.  "John Stuart Mill on Colonies, "Political Theory, Vol. 38. Chin L. T.  1980.  Mill on Liberty , Clarendon Press, Oxford. David O. B. 1992.  "Mill's Deliberative Utilitarianism ," in  Philosophy and Public Affairs Namwambah T. 2007.  Elements and Pedagogy of Critical Thinking.  Nairobi: Dale Smart, J. J. C.; Williams, Bernard (January 1973).  Utilitarianism: For and Against Cambridge University Press. SELF-TEST QUESTIONS   1. “Freedom is only relevant insofar as it does not infringe on the liberties of others”. Discuss  this statement with reference to J.S. Mills’ essay on Individuality. 1. Give a brief history of John Stuart Mill’s life and then discuss his views on  human liberty and freedom as expounded in  On Liberty 2. “The attainment of autonomy is the ultimate goal in human development”  Discuss this in light to J.S. Mills essay on essay on Individuality and Liberty of  Thought 3. Critically examine John Stuart Mill’s view that attainment of autonomy is the  prima facie principle for human existence.
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