In addition to ads persuasive speeches and articles

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Essentials of Business Communication
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 12.2
Essentials of Business Communication
Guffey/Loewy
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In addition to ads, persuasive speeches and articles are everywhere. There are stories about recycling, voting for a particular candidate, school policies, and more trivial matters like which movie star is the most attractive. Each author or speaker states an opinion and supports it with the facts as he or she perceives them. Before agreeing with what you hear or read, you should consider the reliability of the person and information by asking some questions. Notice the questions given in the yellow chart at the top of page 1161 in your textbook. Remember that there is always more than one side to an argument. Even if you agree with a particular point of view, the opposing viewpoint may be equally supported by facts and opinions of other people. In this section, you’ll read the Media Workshop on pages 1160-1165 in Literature Texas Treasures: British Literature. You’ll examine propaganda posters from differing sides of World War II. Be sure to note how both the text and the images convey meaning. Next, read the article from Timemagazine, “Down and Out in Europe,” on pages 1015-1019 of Literature Texas Treasures: British Literature. This article discusses the growing problem of homelessness in Europe. Look for and identify both facts and opinions in the article. What is the purpose of the article? In your notes, summarize the article without adding your own opinions. Finally, listen to the political commercials from the 1980 U.S. presidential campaign from this website:
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Essentials of Business Communication
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 12.2
Essentials of Business Communication
Guffey/Loewy
Expert Verified
73 If you scroll down below the viewing box, you’ll see a list of Republican commercials and a list of Democratic commercials. Watch the first Republican commercial (Reagan) and the first Democratic commercial (Carter). The Republican commercial begins with Governor Reagan, his right hand raised, being sworn into office in California. The Democratic commercial begins with President Carter making a speech. As you listen to the commercials, consider the types of persuasive arguments being used by each candidate. Stop here and complete Assignment 1 - Evaluating Media Coverage. Vocabulary and Grammar Workshop In this vocabulary workshop, you’ll learn about loaded words that build emotion in persuasive writing or speaking. As you read the examples and explanations on page 1116 of your textbook, think about words and phrases you may hear from friends when they are telling a story or trying to persuade you to agree with them. Consider what you hear on television commercials as well. How are loaded words used in everyday situations? Read page 1116 in Literature Texas Treasures: British Literature. Complete numbers 1 and 2 from the practice activity on page 1116. Check your answers with the key in the Resourcessection at the bottom of the course home page. (Sentences 3 and 4 will appear in Assignment 2.) The grammar workshop in this lesson reviews run-on sentences. This kind of error occurs when two independent clauses have no punctuation between them, or when two independent clauses are connected using only a comma. Remember that an independent clause is a complete sentence on its own. To correct run-on sentences, you’ll need to add a semi-colon or a coordinating conjunction, or use a period to separate the clauses into two sentences. Read page 1141 in your textbook for further details about correcting run-on sentences. Correct the first sentence in the “Revise” activity on page 1141 and check your answer with the key in the Resourcessection at the bottom of the course home page. (Sentences 2, 3, and 4 will appear in Assignment 2.) Nonfiction in the Modern Age “In Moulmein, in lower Burma, I was hated by large numbers of people—the only time in my life that I have been important enough for this to happen to me.” “…we arrive at a figure of about 25,000 miles, equal to a trench sufficient to circle the earth.” “…it would have been impossible, completely and entirely, for any woman to have written the plays of Shakespeare in the age of Shakespeare.” “…the long night of barbarism will descend, unbroken even by a star of hope, unless we conquer, as conquer we must; as conquer we shall.” These quotations come from the four nonfiction works you’ll read in this lesson. After reading only the lines above, you may have already developed personal impressions about the authors’ ideas and opinions. After reading the entire piece, your opinion may change, or it may be affirmed. Remember, when using quotations from others in your own essays, you must show the author’s actual, honest opinion and idea rather than taking a quote out of context so that it appears to support your opinion.
74 In this section, you’ll read a narrative essay about a British officer in India, a description of the trenches in World War I, a persuasive essay about the rights of women, and a motivational speech to the British people as they entered World War II. As you read the works in this section, consider the historical and cultural events and influences that shaped the ideas of each author. Review pages 983-996 in Literature Texas Treasures: British Literatureif you need a refresher about events and cultural changes in the world and in Britain. Notice the comparisons and descriptions used by these speakers and compare their perceptions to those of the 21st century. Have ideas changed? Were ideas influenced and developed because of the events and opinions of the Modern Age? Read the following selections from Literature Texas Treasures: British Literature. In your notes, briefly summarize each selection. Be sure to summarize the ideas and opinions of the author without adding your own impressions. “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, pages 1031-1038 excerpt from The Great War and Modern Memoryby Paul Fussell, pages 1051-1054 excerpt from “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf, pages 1099-1104 “Be Ye Men of Valor” by Winston Churchill, pages 1108-1113 Review analogy skills by completing the activity on page 1040 of your textbook. Check your answers with the key in the Resourcessection at the bottom of the course home page. Complete Assignment 3 - Nonfiction. Then complete Assignment 4, in which you’ll write a persuasive essay. Lesson Six, Assignment 1 - Evaluating Media Coverage Multiple Choice.Choose the best answer for each question. 1. What do the British and German posters on pages 1162-1163 have in common? A. Germans are portrayed as unattractive and dirty. B. The opposition is portrayed in a frightening or unattractive manner. C. Each side is sympathetic to its opposition. D. Only one side uses graphics to convey meaning.

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