or self defense training but training that in some aspect we take for granted

Or self defense training but training that in some

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or self-defense training, but training that in some aspect we take for granted that includes you are always between the door and the patient, you know the patient is not on the closest side of the door, because you never know what is going to happen. You get a new patient in, you’re the first one generally if you don’t get anything from the EMTs or paramedics, you are going to be the first one the client/staff interaction they have. so just need to be mindful of that because you don’t know what someone’s history might include. I don’t want to pick on but it could be something they have some mental health issues that have been untreated or not treated appropriately, you never know and you are always on guard in that respect with that manner. Our core competencies of course and again a lot of things we are talking about in this chapters, they are not specific to emergency room nursing; they are specific to nursing. As you know, assessment, that is
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always the first thing we do. You assess as soon as you put your eyes on someone, we are assessing, so never forget that. That’s part of what we do, that is what makes us registered nurses, that ability to assess. Not just a client, but also the situation. Comorbidities are always a big deal for me particularly, we are always looking for when we are doing concept maps and things that you need to be asking questions, and we get so much information from clients just from talking to them. It’s amazing to me how much information that you are able to pass on just from spending time from the patient/client, finding out what their history is and a lot of them appreciate that, it really sets you apart when you spend time, and it makes them feel you are taking a genuine interest in them, and you are for the most part. But for the most part you are trying to be able to provide the best care for them, because a lot of the information the physician may not have, and they are thankful for you that you gathered information more than just the basic. And I have to say gathering that information should not even be considered the bare minimum, it is our responsibility as nurses to do that. I put here also the need for practice modifications, and that is going to play into what type of client and situation you have, what your environment might be and getting back to and alluding to the fact that your clients might be in hallways, you don’t know who else is present a lot of times in that situation. Talk about triage, and the gist of triage is really just establishing priorities. One thing you all have learned to do in nursing school is looking at a situation and really determine, trying to determine who you need to see first, what’s the most important thing you do, first, first first. What do you do first? How do you range client care based off of going back again to your assessment of situation, of the patient, of the environment, particularly what your situation is? Of course triage is going to be dictated by priority, what
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