Point of View The magi as you know were wise men wonderfully wise men who

Point of view the magi as you know were wise men

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Point of View The magi, as you know, were wise men-- wonderfully wise men--who brought gifts to the Babe in the manger. They invented the art of giving Christmas presents. Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two The point of view of Gift of the Magi is in third person narrative, because the characters are only speaking I when they are talking, but descriptions within the book are told by the author, which is O. Henry.
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were the wisest. O all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi .” Irony “Let's put our Christmas presents away and keep 'em a while. They're too nice to use just at present. I sold the watch to get the money to buy your combs. And now suppose you put the chops on." The irony within the story is that the two main characters spent what they valued most in order to give their significant other something especially special for Christmas, only to know that their gifts became useless. The comb for Della became useless because she sold her valued hair to buy a link for Jim’s valued watch, which also became useless because he sold it to buy Della the comb.
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