Fighting in the streets no quarrels of any kind

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fighting in the streets, no quarrels of any kind Erastosthenes deserves to be killed because it undermines the family basis of honour Cohen explains that if you kill your rival you are returning to the old ways of blood feud and that is not acceptable according to the law A person is acting like a hubristic, crazy animalistic person if they do this According to Demosthenes, awarding honours to some citizens encourages others to perform services for the city Without awarding, people would be deterred from seeking honour Honouring too many citizens makes it lose its distinction and purpose This notion of the nobility of rivalry among equals represents the optimistic interpretation of agonism On the Trierarchic Crown: The competition for honour, reputation and supremacy in social and political hierarchies is what’s really at stake in this case Revealed in this oration: the tension between egalitarian democratic ideology of Athenian institutions and the hierarchical claims which are closely
connected with the agonistic social framework in which these institutions are embedded Egalitarian: relating to or believing in the principle that all people are equal and deserve equal rights and opportunities A trierarchy was a public service done by rich families where they furnish, maintain and have the trireme (army ship) ready for the army Whoever has this done first, received a crown Everyone who did not have their ships ready first are arguing in court why Demosthenes does not deserve his crown No value in crown if everyone has it, argues Demosthenes Hierarchy has to be made compatible with equality People who want an award to serve themselves, are not thinking about the betterment of the city In some cases, enmity and revenge are presented as legitimate motivations for litigation whereas envy implies that the accuser’s claims cannot be trusted Enmity and revenge are consistently portrayed as honourable opposed to the shamefulness of envy In Defense of Ctesiphon: Ctesiphon vs. Aeschines in Demosthenes’s oration he states the true motive for Aeschines to bring this suit against the defendant was because of envy builds upon one of the themes in Aristotle’s work of envy being destructive they just keep burning Aeschines Ex. moms a prostitute, dad was a slave, etc Rivalry denied even when engaged One way to fight is to say they are not worth fighting There is blatant elitism Ancient Athenian’s found that envy reflected negatively on one’s character In the courts, it stipulated that the case was unreliable Against Androtion: Demosthenes characterizes his opponent, Euctemon, as someone who brings lawsuits against his enemies to harass them Charged Demosthenes with parricide and prosecuted his uncle for associating with him Androtion argues that this is retaliation for his tax collecting

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