Promoting education and economic development is good in its own right but dont

Promoting education and economic development is good

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Promoting education and economic development is good in its own right — but don’t expect it to combat terrorism. Instead, we should think small , in part because in the West the problem involves small numbers of potential terrorists: thousands, not millions. The focus should be on high-risk communities, both Muslim and non-Muslim. Prisons, for example, are breeders of terrorists, and ensuring that radicals do not dominate religious instruction behind bars and that there are programs (and intelligence agents) in place to stop terrorist recruitment is vital . Particularly important is targeting what terrorism expert William McCants calls “law- abiding supporters” — those who embrace jihadist ideas on social media or are otherwise clearly at risk of joining a terrorist group, but have not yet broken the law. Using community interventions and other means to move these people off the path of violence will prevent the stark choice of jail or Syria, and give family members of potential recruits a reason to seek out government help.
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--- 1nc Defense – No Impact ISIS not plotting attacks against the West --- surveillance will prevent fighters returning home from carrying out attacks Byman, 15 --- professor in the security studies program at Georgetown University and research director of the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings (2/13/2015, Daniel, “Five myths about violent extremism,” - extremism/2015/02/13/2dc72786-b215-11e4-827f-93f454140e2b_story.html , JMP) ***note --- Byman is listing “myths” about violent extremism and answering them 4. The fighting in Iraq and Syria will spawn terrorism in the West. The flow of foreign fighters to Iraq and Syria has understandably alarmed security officials around the world. FBI Director James Comey expressed the views of many when he warned in May 2014 that “there’s going to be a diaspora out of Syria at some point, and we are determined not to let lines be drawn from Syria today to a future 9/11.” But officials raised similar fears about foreign fighters involved in earlier conflicts, especially after the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, and those conflicts did not produce a surge in terrorism in Europe or the U nited S tates. Many of the most dangerous foreign fighters die on the battlefield, blowing themselves up in suicide attacks or perishing in firefights. Others opt to continue fighting in the region. And those who return home are likely to be under the surveillance of state security services, inhibiting their ability to carry out attacks . So far the Islamic State’s agenda is first and foremost local and regional — killing Alawites and Shiites, toppling the governments in Iraq and Syria, and so on — not plotting attacks against the West . There remains a real threat, especially from “lone wolf” attacks , as the cachet of the Islamic State inspires Muslims around the world. But such attacks are unlikely to be on the scale of 9/11 or carried out in a sustained way .
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1nc Islamophobia / Discrimination Adv ***Note when prepping file --- this particular evidence is
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