bones exudate swollen Sinuses Tenderness Mouth THRUSH ULCERS MALNUTRITION

Bones exudate swollen sinuses tenderness mouth thrush

This preview shows page 224 - 229 out of 253 pages.

bones), exudate, swollen Sinuses Tenderness Mouth THRUSH, ULCERS, MALNUTRITION Tonsils Red, swollen, pus pockets
Diagnostics XRAY MRI Contraindications for CT/MRI CT Labs Cultures from nasal passage Cultures from throat CBC Pulse Oximetry A noninvasive method to monitor the oxygen saturation of the blood. Does not replace ABGs Normal level is 95% to 100%. May be unreliable MOST IMPORTANT FOR DETECTING CHANGES Cyanosis (p. 474) Examination of Lymph nodes Palpate lymph nodes Upper Respiratory Infections Most common reason for seeking healthcare- COLDS being the most frequently occurring. May be minor , acute , chronic , severe , or life threatening Treated in community settings: doctor offices, urgent care clinics, long-term care facilities, or self-care at home Early detection of signs and symptoms and appropriate interventions can avoid unnecessary complications Patient teaching focus on prevention and health promotion
Rhinitis and Rhinosinusitis Special considerations for older adults (Chart 22-1) Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis: acute, chronic, (refer to Fig. 22-1 and Table 22-1) Rhinitis –inflammation and irritation of the mucous membranes of the nose Rhinosinusitis –inflammation of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity Acute, subacute, and chronic Incidence –affects 10%-30% population worldwide annually Can a change in weather cause rhinitis? What medications can cause rhinitis? Clinical manifestations Longer than 10 days = infections Facial tenderness, headache Fever, achy Sore throat, cough Sneezing, runny/stuffy nose (rhinorrhea), runny eyes Can a change in weather cause rhinitis? What medications can cause rhinitis? Clinical manifestations Longer than 10 days = infections Facial tenderness, headache Fever, achy Sore throat, cough Sneezing, runny/stuffy nose (rhinorrhea), runny eyes Prevention Hygiene Flu vaccine Long term medical management Avoid allergens Allergy testing/desensitizing Steroids
Pharmacological Management Antihistamine verses decongestant NSAIDS, gargles, guaifenesin Nasal decongestants Antivirals Nasal agents Mast cell stabilizers Steroids Intranasal ipratropium (Atrovent) Leukotriene modifiers Other Upper Respiratory Infections Pharyngitis : acute, chronic (refer to Fig. 22-2) Definition –sudden painful inflammation of the pharynx Incidence –USA app 11 million annually Cause Viral –adenovirus, influenza, Epstein-Barr Bacterial –group A strep Clinical manifestations Preventive health care Tonsillitis, adenoiditis Definition Tonsillitis—infection of tonsils Adenoiditis—infection of adenoids Cause –GABHS, Epstein-Barr virus Clinical manifestations Sore throat, fever, snoring, difficulty swallowing, swollen lymph nodes, nausea and vomiting Health care (p.547)
Strep Throat Sudden onset 1-5 days after exposure 20% ATB resistant Very serious if left untreated Diagnosis throat swab Scarlet fever, or scarlatina Is often accompanied by: Rash with urticaria- begins on face and spreads downward Strawberry tongue N/V, abdominal pain Red lines in folds of skin

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture