With unbounded media the communications are not

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With unbounded media the communications are not physically contained. Unbounded media includes radio waves and light waves. Bounded media, on the other hand, means the communications are physically contained within some sort of cable. In this lesson, we're going to take a look at the different types of bounded media that you will encounter in a network environment. Coaxial 0:37-1:42 We'll start by talking about a network medium that most people are familiar with, coaxial. Coaxial network cabling is made up of four different components. At the center is the inner conductor, which is typically made of a solid wire that is coated in either copper or silver. Transmissions on a network travel along this inner wire in the form of electrical signals. To protect the transmissions and prevent grounding the wire is surrounded by an insulator which is usually made of a flexible PVC. Around the insulator is some sort of metallic shield, typically an aluminum mesh. This metallic layer is used for grounding. To complete the cable, the entire assembly here is coated with a plastic jacket. Know that this is a generalization of how coaxial cables are constructed. There are actually several ways a coaxial cable can be made. For example, the insulation layer could be foam or even air and the cable could have two or more shield layers. The way a coaxial cable is constructed affects its transmission capabilities. This results in coaxial cables having different types or grades. Coaxial Types 1:43-3:02 There are actually dozens of different types of coaxial cables, each of which has its own electrical specifications. And mixing coaxial types can cause transmission errors or prevent communication altogether. Because of this, it's critical that you select the proper coaxial cable type for a specific application and luckily there are only two types of coaxial cables you need to know about.
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The first type is RG59. RG59 coaxial cables are constructed just like this example here. These types of cables are used for video transmission in CCTV systems. They also used to be used quite a bit to transmit satellite and cable TV broadcasts. RG59 coaxial cables aren't used much anymore because they lose a lot of signal quality over long distances. Instead, almost all industries use the second type of cable you need to know about, RG6. RG6 coaxial cables are constructed with between one and four layers of shielding. In addition, the internal wire is typically made of a solid copper. RG6 cables have much lower signal loss over longdistances than RG59, resulting in a higher quality signal. This is why RG59 is quickly being replaced by RG6 cables. RG6 coaxial cables are used for cable televisions, satellite television, and cable modems. Coaxial Connectors 3:03-3:43 In addition to the different types of cables, coaxial also uses different types of connectors. The most common connector and the one you're probably familiar with, is the F type connector, which is this connector here.
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