School Achievements Their involvement in Sustainable Schools and particularly

School achievements their involvement in sustainable

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School Achievements Their involvement in Sustainable Schools, and particularly the Stormwater Action Project, has led to each school achieving economic, educa- tional, environmental, and social outcomes (see Table 1), together with achievements such as: embedding Sustainable Schools in their school operations and curriculum across all Key Learning Areas, engaging student learning, involving students in working towards a sus- tainable future, developing extensive links with their local (and often broader) communities, high staff and student morale in the school, and establishing a basis for future development as a Sustainable School and model for others. Table 1 summarizes the findings from the eval- uation in terms of the economic, educational, environmental, and social outcomes in the six schools. In the next section the limiting factors are discussed. Success Factors There are a number of common factors for the success of Sustainable Schools in the six Stormwater Action Project schools. The follow- ing factors were common across the six schools: Broad ownership of and engagement with Sustainable Schools across the school, Teachers, students and parents share the vi- sion of the environment having a high profile in the school, Support of the school leadership team, Enthusiastic and committed staff, Immersion of all staff in the Core unit, The structure of Sustainable Schools made it easy to implement, Integrating sustainability into school opera- tions and across the curriculum, Student involvement in the day to day sus- tainability operations in the school, The availability of funds to enable the devel- opment of visible sustainability infrastructure (such as rainwater tanks), and There is a school grounds master plan that helps bring together all aspects of achieving a Sustainable School. There are also key success factors for Sustain- able Schools as a whole: It uses an ecological approach, shifting em- phasis from “relationships based on sepa- ration, control and manipulation towards those based on participation, empowerment and self-organisation” (Sterling, 2001, p. 49), rather than a behaviorist or mechanistic ap- proach; It is encourages a transformative, instead of transmissive, approach to education; The focus is on facilitating a culture change process for improved learning and action; It is a framework for change, not a program, allowing schools to proceed at their own pace to identify issues, set goals and targets, plan an approach, and take actions to achieve these targets; The Core unit assists schools to develop a common purpose and vision for the school; The collection of baseline data gives a strong reference base against which future change can be measured; The guided process leads to the program be- ing embedded in the culture of the school (as shown by the program being part of the
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346 A. GOUGH Table 1 economic, educational, environmental, and social outcomes in the schools Economic outcomes Savings from reduced water consumption (by having gardens rather than lawns and through using stored water for garden use).
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  • Summer '20
  • Dr joseph
  • The Land, Sustainable Schools

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