Explicit in consideration it makes explicit the

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Explicit in consideration:  it makes explicit the consideration of how the various alternatives contribute to the various goals. Open ended:  it puts the decision making process out in the open, enabling it to be  carefully reviewed by a particular decision maker and also by others involved in a group  decision process.   ii)                  Disadvantages of Decision As Calculation   At times difficult and less effective:  The calculation method can be more difficult and less  effective especially where the choices are equally relevant. For example, if one is trying to  decide what to study between philosophy and computer science, you list all the criteria and  estimate the extent to which each option satisfies them and then proceed to a calculation of  the expected value of the competing choices. Having done this, you find that the expected  value of one option, say philosophy, exceeds that of the other. But in instances where you  have a reaction, e.g.  “I don’t want to do that!”  may be caused by the numerical weights you  put on your criteria which might not necessarily reflect what you really care about or reality of expected output or benefit. Inability for emotional evaluation:  There is empirical evidence that calculation may  sometimes be inferior to intuition in making good judgements. People with mental problems  do not know what they care about hence cannot have emotional evaluations.   In this regard there seems to be a need for a model of decision-making that is more psychologically  natural and more normatively effective than the calculation model; let’s call it emotional coherence.   c)      Decision As Coherence  
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Decision-making is a kind of inference. Many philosophers have taken deductive logic as the model  for inference.   An inference is a step of the mind, an intellectual act by which one concludes that something is so in light of something else's being so, or seeming to be so.  For example:          Whenever you want ice cream, you should order chocolate.         You want ice cream.          Therefore  you should order chocolate.   Unfortunately, we rarely have general rules that tell us exactly what to do, thus rendering deduction  as not a good model for practical inference. A second familiar model of inference discussed is  calculation of which limitations have also been cited.
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