610 further reading bell fg cripps jc culshaw mg

This preview shows page 222 - 225 out of 460 pages.

6.10 Further Reading Bell FG, Cripps JC, Culshaw, MG, Coffey JR (eds) (1990) Field testing in engineering geology. Geological Society of London (Engineering Geology Special Publication 6) Craig C (ed) (1996) Advances in site investigation practice. Thomas Telford, London McCann DM, Eddleston M, Fenning PJ, Reeves GM (eds) (1997) Modern geophysics in engineering ge- ology. Geological Society of London (Engineering Group Special Publication 12) McDowell PW, Barker RD, Butcher AP, Culshaw MG, Jackson PD, McCann DM, Skipp BO, Mathews SL, Arthur JCR (eds) (2002) Geophysics in engineering investigations. Joint publication of the Geologi- cal Society of London (Engineering Group Special Publication 12), and CIRIA, London Downloaded From : Downloaded From :
Chapter 7 Practical experience has shown that for a site investigation to be successful it must be well planned and undertaken in an orderly manner, using appropriate and well main- tained field and laboratory equipment, operated by experienced and skilled personnel. Expertise in the mechanics of investigation (boring, testing etc.) is a routine re- quirement in all investigations. The most difficult problem is how and where, and when, to use the various ‘tools’ available to the site investigator. A philosophy of site investi- gation has built up over recent years which proposes the idea of the developing inves- tigation advancing in stages to a satisfactory conclusion, each stage being built on a sound foundation of knowledge established by the previous stage. 7.1 Stages of Investigation The stages of investigation described below are but the expression of a principle. The stages do not need to be separate; they may merge into each other and additional stages may be inserted. 7.1.1 Project Conception Stage After the decision to initiate a project has been taken, a desk study is undertaken of all available geotechnical, geological and topographical data. The proposed site and its environs should be examined by an experienced engineering geologist. The objec- tive of this stage is to try to identify potential problems that may arise from site geotechnical conditions in relation to the proposed engineering work. Here it may be noted that the term Site Investigation is taken by many to represent the investigation of the site per-se, including its previous use, ownership, access etc. An investigation of the ground at a site is thus a Ground Investigation and but part of a Site Investigation. The engineering geologist is usually concerned with both these aspects of the work. The geotechnical, geological and topographical data should include: all available topographic maps, all available geological and hydrogeological maps, memoirs and published articles in the scientific journals, aerial photographs at all scales, Organisation, Design and Reporting of Site Investigations Downloaded From : Downloaded From :
210 C HAPTER 7 ·

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture