After that he went out with the army to Raumar\u00edki and raided there and took

After that he went out with the army to raumaríki

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After that he went out with the army to Raumaríki and raided there and took that region by force. 99 viðjar . . . : ‘? of the withy’, a kenning for fire. The line is one syllable short; a word meaning ‘destroyer’ must have been lost. 100 ƒ lgylðir : ‘wolf (destroyer) of alder’, fire. 101 sonr Fornjóts : ‘son of (the giant) Fornjótr’, fire. Snorri says that fire can also be called the brother of the wind, which is also referred to as son of Fornjótr ( Skáldsk 39). 102 áttkonr lofða kyns : offspring of a royal family.
ynglinga saga º¹ CHAPTER FORTY-FOUR Hálfdan hvítbeinn was a powerful king. He married Ása, daughter of Eysteinn inn harðráði (the Harsh Ruler), king of the Upplendingar. He ruled over Heiðmǫrk. She and Hálfdan had two sons, Eysteinn and Guðrøðr. Hálfdan gained possession of a large part of Heiðmǫrk and Þótn and Haðaland and much of Vestfold. He lived to be an old man. He died of sickness at [76] Þótn and was then taken out to Vestfold and placed in a mound at the place called Skæreið in Skíringssalr. So says Þjóðólfr: 27. All have heard Ynglingatal 30 that Hálfdan was mourned by all mediators, and the goddess, guardian of stones thrown, 103 the king at Þótn took. And Skæreið in Skíringssalr broods over the bones of the warrior. 104 CHAPTER FORTY-FIVE Ingjaldr, brother of Hálfdan, was king in Vermaland, but after his death King Hálfdan took Vermaland under his power and took tribute from it and appointed jarls to rule there while he was alive. [77] CHAPTER FORTY-SIX Eysteinn, son of Hálfdan hvítbeinn, who was king after him in Raumaríki and Vestfold, married Hildr, daughter of Eiríkr Agnarsson, who was king in Vestfold. Agnarr, Eiríkr’s father, was the son of King Sigtryggr of Vendill. King Eiríkr had no son. He died while King Hálfdan hvítbeinn was alive. Father and son, Hálfdan and Eysteinn, took all of Vestfold under their power. Eysteinn ruled Vestfold while he was alive. There was a king then in Varna who was called Skjǫldr. He was very skilled in magic. King Eysteinn went across to Varna with a few warships and raided there, took whatever came 103 hallvarps hlífinauma : ‘the protecting Nauma (goddess) of stone-building? (burial mound)’, Hel. 104 brynjálfr : ‘mailcoat-elf’, warrior.
ºº heimskringla to hand, clothes and other valuables and farmers’ goods, and made coastal raids, then went away. King Skǫldr came to the shore with his army. King Eysteinn had left by then and reached the other side of the fiord, and Skjǫldr saw their sails. Then he took his cloak and waved it round and blew into it. When they were sailing round Jarlsey, King Eysteinn was sitting at the rudder. Another ship sailed close to them. There was rather a swell. The tacking boom on the other ship knocked the king overboard. That was the death of him. His men retrieved his body. It was taken into Borró and a mound raised for him out on the ridge by the sea near the Vaðla river. So says Þjóðólfr: 28. But a sailyard Ynglingatal 31 sent Eysteinn to Býleistr’s brother’s girl, 105 [78] under sea’s bones 106 the bidder of men 107 rests now on the ridge’s crest, where, snow-cold, by the Gautish king, to the sea flows the stream of Vaðla.

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