Revelations of chinese history prove that the chinese

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A History of Modern Psychology
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 7
A History of Modern Psychology
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Revelations of Chinese history prove that the Chinese as a people are independent in spirit and in conduct. Coerced into touch with other people, they could at times live in peace with them by maintaining friendly relations and at others assimilate them. . . During the periods when their political and military prowess declined, they could not escape for the time from the fate of a conquered nation, but they could eventually vigorously reassert themselves. Thus the Mongol rule of China, lasting nearly a hundred years was finally overthrown by Tai Tse of the Ming dynasty and his loyal follower. So in our own time was the Manchu yoke thrown off by the Chinese. Nationalistic ideas in China did not come from a foreign source; they were inherited from our remote forefathers. Roosevelt in the Caribbean Under President Theodore Roosevelt, the United States expanded its influ- ence over nations in the Caribbean and the rest of Latin America after the Spanish-American War. In this car- toon, Roosevelt marches through the Caribbean while carrying a club, a ref- erence to a West African proverb that was one of his favorite expressions: “Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far.” The Granger Collection, New York CHAPTER Document-Based Investigation
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A History of Modern Psychology
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 7
A History of Modern Psychology
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THE AGE OF IMPERIALISM 767 D OCUMENT 4 a. Identify Why does President Fillmore say he has sent Perry and his squadron to Japan? b. Infer Why do you think President Fillmore mention that Perry has arrived “with a powerful squadron”? How did attitudes toward imperialism differ between the people who were founding colonies and those whose countries were colonized? Using the documents above and information from the chapter, form a thesis that explains your position. Then write a short essay to support it. See Skills Handbook , p. H25 Kipling’s “The White Man’s Burden” British poet Rudyard Kipling was born in India—at the time a British colony—and was a great supporter of imperialism. He believed that the countries of Europe and the United States had a duty to help the people of Africa, Asia, and Latin America, a duty he referred to as the “White Man’s Burden” in the 1899 poem of that name, part of which is printed below. Take up the White Man’s burden— Ye dare not stoop to less— Nor call too loud on Freedom To cloke your weariness; By all ye cry or whisper, By all ye leave or do, The silent, sullen peoples Shall weigh your gods and you. Take up the White Man’s burden— Have done with childish days— The lightly proferred laurel, The easy, ungrudged praise. Comes now, to search your manhood Through all the thankless years Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom, The judgments of your peers! Letter to the Emperor of Japan In 1853 U.S. president Millard Fillmore sent Com- modore Matthew Perry and four large warships to Japan. His purpose was the request the opening of Japan to trade with the United States. An excerpt from Fillmore’s letter to the emperor of Japan appears below.

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