At this time they conspired with other industry

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At this time, they conspired with other industry leaders to keep negative research away from their workers and the general public Much later, claimed they had no knowledge of health issues Released their own misleading research which they failed to find a link between exposure and cancer in animals (not asbestosis)
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Law Suits 1960s medical research began to conclusively show the dangers of asbestos 1964: due to growing public knowledge, Mansville began putting warning labels on their products Prior to ‘64 Manville said there was not enough proof for asbestos related suits In 1977 the internal memos were found leading to tens of thousands of
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The Result In 1973 an appellate court ruled that asbestos manufactures could be held liable for their failure to warn of the danger of their product Between ‘68 and ’82 Manville was the defendant in ~13,000 law suits Manville owed $606 million for suits between the early 1970s and 1982 In 1982 Manville filed for bankruptcy despite being having $2.3 billion in assets The first Fortune 500 company to do so
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Costs of Illness and Injury Costs are direct or indirect Direct: doctor bills, medicine, insurance payments, rehabilitation, home or nursing home care, and medical supplies and equipment Indirect: lost wages, household production loss, and employer productivity loss Costs obviously depend on the condition and the type of care required Total estimates of the cost of occupational disease range between $128b and $155b and 49,000 to 74,000 deaths per year
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Determining Causality The exact number of workplace induced diseases is unknown because it is difficult to show a causal link Many factors may contribute to the development of disease, beyond workplace conditions Predisposition and environmental risk factors may interact The same toxin (e.g. asbestos) may interact with the body in numerous way making it difficult to say exposure will lead to a particular disease
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Compensation To hold employers liable for exposure to toxic chemicals or injuries in civil court, it has to be shown that the employer acted intentionally This is difficult to do Instead, worker compensation laws allow sick or injured employees to be compensated without proving fault These laws vary by state Require that they give up their right to sue
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Case Study: Film Recovery Systems Believed to be the first time a firm’s executives were held responsible for the death of a worker as the result of an industrial accident The workers were responsible for stirring large tanks of water and sodium cyanide and spoke little to no English The workers were unaware they were working with cyanide When mixed with water, the cyanide would turn into the same gas the Nazi’s and U.S. gas chambers used
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Case Study: Film Recovery Systems The workers were not issued any specialized gloves, glasses, face masks, or clothing for any of the tasks involving cyanide The masks they were issued were not for fumes
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