Doubtless within different cities and tribes of

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king god who created the world. Doubtless, within different cities and tribes of Middle East, it was deemed that each one of them had its gods who were called by a different name despite carrying the same functions [Ares in Greece and Mars in Rome]. Such as the Yahweh God who was referred to as El by Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. "I appeared as El-Shaddai, I did not make my name Yahweh known to them." (Exodus, pg. 56) Moreover, in some portions of Genesis and 2 | P a g e
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Exodus, the existence of the other deities was customarily unknown to many Israelites but was never denied. As an example, the god Baal the son of El and Asherah initially emerged in a city of Canaan was known as the god of fertility, yet later adopted by Israelites as the god of nourishment. II The second part of this paper deals with the prophets, Elijah and Elisha, and their impact on the choice of kings who served as the servants of the Yahweh god. In the books of Kings, Elijah and Elisha defined as the prophets with supernatural powers. Whereby, Elijah had powers to revive the dead, control food supplies, as well as, control the weather. (1 Kings, pg. 229- 230) Elisha, on the other hand, had the same powers of Elijah, also the abilities to cure diseases, "cure [Naaman] of his skin-disease" (2 Kings, pg. 341) through a particular procedure of washing in a river [ equivalent to baptism in Christianity]. Through ancient times, the prophets were known for their abilities to communicate with gods. Thus, helping the kings, they served to either win or give forethoughts of future actions that believed to be envisioned and decided by the god's will. Formerly, the kingdoms of an ancient Israelites did not have kings whereas Yahweh was the superior ruler of all lands and people. However, due to the war with a Philistines that Israelites were losing and misbehaving of sons of Samuel, the people decided to revolt under the impression that they need the human king over the god [eventually rejecting Yahweh]. It is asserted that Yahweh heard his people cry "give us a king to judge us, like the other nations" (Samuel, pg. 259) and was enraged by their notions. Even when Yahweh conveyed the message to his people through Samuel that described the disadvantages of a human king and precautions regarding his aid in their desperate times, they 3 | P a g e
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indeed refused to listen. Eventually, Yahweh decided to give them a king “a man from the territory of Benjamin" (Samuel, pg. 260) as a gift which was chosen by a sacred lot. Moreover, after the lot cleansing the king [Saul] from what is thought to be evil spirits " the spirit of Yahweh will then seize on you, and you will go into ecstasy with them, and be changed into another man." (Samuel, page 261) In other words, cleansing that chosen from abominations that presumably existed and continued to inflict horrors into people without the god's protection. One of such examples indicated in the story when Saul meet King David subsequently following Yahweh rejection of Saul which leaves him vulnerable. Therefore, whenever Saul was inflicted with evil spirits, it was essentially required to play music to conjure the spirits away. "David
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  • Spring '12
  • obi
  • The Bible, Elijah, Books of Samuel, Books of Kings, Yahweh, Asherah

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