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Q19 in many nations criminal law does not apply to

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------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q19: In many nations, criminal law does not apply to corporations, but in the United Stated today, a corporation commits a crime whenever one of its employees commits a crime, if the employee acted within the scope of his or her authority and if the corporation benefited as a result. A. a corporation commits a crime whenever one of its employees commits a crime, if the employee acted B. a corporation is committing a crime whenever one of its employees committed a crime, if those employees were acting C. corporations commit a crime whenever one of its employees does, on the condition that the employee acts D. corporations commit crimes whenever an employee of those corporations commit a crime, if it was while acting E. the corporation whose employees commit a crime, commits a crime, whenever the employee acted Answer: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q20: Which of the following most logically completes the reasoning? Either food scarcity or excessive hunting can threaten a population of animals. If the 10
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group faces food scarcity, individuals in the group will reach reproductive maturity later than otherwise. If the group faces excessive hunting, individuals that reach reproductive maturity earlier will come to predominate. Therefore, it should be possible to determine whether prehistoric mastodons became extinct because of food scarcity or human hunting, since there are fossilized mastodon remains from both before and after mastodon populations declined, and ______. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q21 to Q23: In the 1930’s and 1940’s, African American industrial workers in the southern United Line States, who constituted 80 per- (5) cent of the unskilled factory labor force there, strongly supported unionization. While the American Federation of Labor (AFL) either excluded African Americans or (10) maintained racially segregated unions, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) organized integrated unions nationwide on the basis of a stated policy of equal (15) rights for all, and African American unionists provided the CIO’s back- bone. Yet it can be argued that through contracts negotiated and enforced by White union mem- (20) bers, unions—CIO unions not excluded—were often instrumen- tal in maintaining the occupational segregation and other forms of racial discrimination that kept (25) African Americans socially and economically oppressed during this period. However, recognizing employers’ power over workers 11
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as a central factor in African (30) Americans’ economic marginal- ization, African American workers saw the need to join with White workers in seeking change despite White unionists’ toleration of or (35) support for racial discrimination.
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