Marginalized in julius caesar portia and calpurnia

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marginalized in Julius Caesar. Portia and Calpurnia are the women in the play, and are confined to the domestic household. However, there are important differences between them. Portia is the first of the two to appear, and she struggles to convince Brutus that she is worthy of his confidence Caesar is full of cryptic omens: the soothsayer's advice for Caesar to "beware the Ides of March," bad weather, wacky animal behavior, scary dreams, and, of course, ghosts foreboding mood in Act II, Scene 2 of Julius Caesar. Certainly, the weather is ominous, as the thunder and lightning threaten in the heavens. Caesar himself observes,. Nor heaven nor earth have been at peace tonight: Thrice hath Calpurnia in her sleep cried out, "Help ho! They murder Caesar One of the themes that is important not just in Act II but in the whole play is that of the corrupting influence of power. In Act II scene 1, Brutus discusses the potential for corruption that he fears in Julius Caesar, thinking that if he were not opposed at this stage, he would come to "scorn the base degrees" and forget his empathy orchard. It is night and he calls impatiently for his servant, Lucius, and sends him to light a candle in his study.

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