Suffrage amendment with purpose of disfranchisement set precedent several other

Suffrage amendment with purpose of disfranchisement

This preview shows page 8 - 11 out of 16 pages.

Suffrage amendment with purpose of disfranchisement set precedent several other states Poll tax, disqualification for convicts, required persons to read and understand state constitution South Carolina; “Pitchfork Ben” Tillman The Black Response Bitterly denounced racist amendments; unable to garner white support Effective Disfranchisement By 1910, blacks effectively disenfranchised in North Carolina, Alabama, Virginia, Georgia, and Oklahoma Back to Slavery “White Primary” excluded blacks by party rules Blacks had no political clout Plessy v. Ferguson 1895 Supreme Court case upheld segregation doctrine of “separate but equal” White Man’s Country “Insider” and “Outsider” status based on racial identity sanctioned by legal process Public space considered white private property Segregated transportation evoked most notable challenges to Jim Crow Confronting the Urban Color Line Confronting the Urban Color line Rapid growth of blacks in urban cities, More economic and social opportunities; More prominent color line
Image of page 8
Employment and Unions Difficult for blacks to find jobs and join unions in cities Housing Difficulty finding housing exaggerated by segregation; created congestion Transportation: Introduction of Jim Crow streetcars brought on black boycotts and protests Black women played primary role America’s Empire of Color The United States Expands U.S. imperialist ambitions focused on lands and resources of world’s darker- skinned peoples “Scramble for Africa” Hawaiian Islands and other small pacific islands The Caribbean U.S. increasingly interested in South America and Caribbean Cuba Sinking of the Maine The Spanish American War Some African Americans enlisted in the army Some were vocal anti-imperialists Black troops were treated poorly during the war but had much success in battle Reinforced the Rough Riders Early Commercial Trade Networks West African Trade Routes Ecological conditions necessitated specialization and trade Trans-Saharan trade connected West Africans with people and goods from distant places Gold, Africa’s most valuable trade item Reginald Lewis The Berbers “converted many of the merchants of West Africa to Islam, but most of the common people retained their traditions Interregional Trade Ethnic groups linked into regional networks by inland waterways Trade facilitation Rise of Empires in West Africa Against this background, there arose a number of kingdoms and empires starting in the 5th century through to the 16th century. Common to each of the great empires was extensive trans-Saharan trade with the north Large standing armies An effective system taxation Trade The ancient West Africans, like Native Americans “believed that many gods existed in nature”
Image of page 9
They did not accept the Muslim belief in one god.
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 16 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture