Boeing has a dynamic self isolated process related

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one long row of different stations being moved by a belt-fed system that transports one step of the process to the other. Boeing has a dynamic, self- isolated process related assembly that involves (regarding just the 737) a 9-day assembly where different teams are broken down to put together the 737 aircraft. On day 1 the fuselage is brought in (already assembled in Kansas) and hauled into Renton. Days one through three involve all the internals of the fuselage, similar to building a house. You have the framework and you want to do the plumbing, electrical, and other ins and outs you might need. Day 4 the tail and wings are added, along with the landing gear (at this point the aircraft is still held up like an engine hanging from the casing). Day 5 the engineers and mechanics put on the horizontal stabilizer. On the 6th day, the floorboards are put on, final wiring, and the galley and other small internal things are finalized. They also run some of the first power tests to make sure everything is functional. Functional but not operational. That leads us into day 7 where the engineers now start to run operational tests on the aircraft. Day 8 the final flight control tests are complete and come day 9 the client is able to come through and do their walkthrough and personal inspection of the aircraft to make sure it is up to par for them and their business (Stewart J., 2016) ~JC References Heizer, J. H., Render, B., & Munson, C. (2017). Operations management: Sustainability and supply chain management. Stewart J. (2016) How Boeing Builds a 737 in Just 9 Days. Retrieved from Andrew Onken Jul 8, 2020 # Reply " JC, Great post. It’s amazing that Boeing has streamlined the production process so well that they can assemble a 737 in just over a week. It sounds like they have duplicated the modular house technique by having as much of the aircraft prefabricated and ready for assembly. I was curious if the company works around the clock to produce the aircraft but was unable to find the answer. I did find an article that specified that they are shooting to get the assembly down to 8 days which they equated to “4,000 airplane unit hours of work”. I believe that that means the assembly would have to be round the clock. Jonathan Cudo Jul 9, 2020 # Reply " Andrew - From my inside knowledge of friends that work at Boeing, they do run round the clock assembly and maintenance. It is not mandatory. They have 3 shifts: Morning, mid, and evening shifts, and then they allow overtime (which almost everyone takes advantage of). So it looks like you are right in that thought process. ~JC Andrew Onken Jul 9, 2020 # Reply " Thanks for the follow up. That is still a very impressive timeline. I also saw that they use upwards of 50 gallons of paint on the 737 and it can weigh over 300lbs alone depending on the design a customer chooses.

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