Civil disobedience intentional breaking of a law in a

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Civil disobedience – intentional breaking of a law in a nonviolent or passive manner Civil Rights Movement – social movement of the 1950s and 1960s to establish equality and civil rights for African Americans Integration – acceptance and equal access for all people into a group or place Segregation – enforced separation of groups
Social activism – use of direct action to bring about social change Event or Action Organization/Key People Strategy Brown v. Board of Education : The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1954 that school segregation was unconstitutional. NAACP, Linda Brown's father and other parents, Thurgood Marshall was the NAACP attorney arguing the case to the Supreme Court Legal: the NAACP focused on challenging unjust laws through the U.S. Court system. The Brown v. Board of Education decision was their first significant victory. School Desegregation Montgomery Bus Boycott Tallahassee Bus Boycott Freedom Rides March on Washington Children’s Crusade Freedom Summer Selma March and Bloody Sunday 7.03 Minority Rights The Big Ideas How were the Civil Rights Movement and other social movements of the 1960s similar? How were women viewed by most of society in the 1950s? How did this change in the 1960s? What was the Equal Rights Amendment? What happened to it? Who were the United Farm Workers? How did they fight for their cause? What was the Native American Power movement? How did life change for Native Americans in 1953?
What did Native Americans gain through social activism in the 1960s and early 1970s?

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