TRUE Speakers of nonstandard dialects of English are likely to end up in lower

True speakers of nonstandard dialects of english are

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TRUESpeakers of nonstandard dialects of English are likely to end up in lower-level jobs than speakers of standard English.Adler - Chapter 02 #69Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Regional Differences70.The unwritten rules for smiling differ from one part of the U.S. to another. TRUEThe unwritten rules for smiling differ from one part of the country to another.Adler - Chapter 02 #70Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Regional Differences71.Don't treat persons who have disabilities as if they are "different." TRUEDon't treat persons who have disabilities as if they are "different."Adler - Chapter 02 #71Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities72.The phrase "paraplegic" has exactly the same significance as the phrase "a person who is using a wheelchair." FALSEWe can show respect to persons with disabilities by describing the disability as a feature (e.g. a wheelchair user) rather than an intrinsic part of who they are (wheelchair-bound or paraplegic).Adler - Chapter 02 #72Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities
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73.A disability is not a defining characteristic of any person; it is simply one feature of their lives. TRUEWe can show respect to persons with disabilities by describing the disability as one feature of their lives (e.g. a wheelchair user) rather than an intrinsic part of who they are (wheelchair-bound or paraplegic).Adler - Chapter 02 #73Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities74.Before you speak to a person with a visual impairment, identify yourself. FALSEIdentify who you are when you encounter a person who has a visual impairment.Adler - Chapter 02 #74Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities75.It is rude to lean on someone's wheelchair. TRUELeaning on someone's wheelchair may be considered a violation of the wheelchair user's personal space.Adler - Chapter 02 #75Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities76.If you have trouble understanding a person who has a speech disability, pretend you understand so they won't have to repeat themselves. FALSEIf you have trouble understanding a speaker, ask them to repeat themselves. Don't pretend you understand if you don't.Adler - Chapter 02 #76Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities77.You don't need to ask persons with disabilities whether they would like help; just step forth quickly to assist them with tasks that may be hard for them (such as opening doors). TRUEAsk before you help. Some persons with disabilities have different preferences than others.Adler - Chapter 02 #77Topic: Culture and Communication in a Diverse Society: Disabilities78.Within any culture, we can find a wide variety of communication styles displayed; for this reason, we should avoid stereotyping members of that culture.
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