17 Craig F Bohren How can a particle absorb more than the light incident on it

17 craig f bohren how can a particle absorb more than

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17. Craig F. Bohren, "How can a particle absorb more than the light incident on it?" Am. J. Phys ., 51(4), Apr. 1983, p. 323-327. Actually the resonant particle increases its geometrical reaction cross section, thus intercepting not on the Poynting component intercepted by a static unit charge, but also some additional energy from the surrounding and unaccounted Heaviside flow component. In short, Bohren's experiment decisively proves the presence of the unaccounted Heaviside energy flow component. 18.H. Paul and R. Fischer, {Comment on “How can a particle absorb more than the light incident on it?’},” Am. J. Phys., 51(4), Apr. 1983, p. 327. 19. T. E. Bearden, “Energy Flow, Collection, and Dissipation in Overunity EM Devices,” ibid ., 1997. For the very rough calculation, see Figure 5, p. 16. 20. And to most other branches of physics. The effect upon quantum mechanics of the introduction of hidden order inside every potential — including the quantum potential — would seem to have startling consequences. Similar hidden order exists inside every ordinary EM field and wave, if we add superpotential theory where two potential functions comprise any EM field or wave. Each of those two potentials is subject to direct alteration of its internal Whittaker structuring, which at least in theory can be engineered. In stripping the interacting charge of its self-fields and self-potentials, Lorentz-Dirac electron theory eliminates the associated deterministic, negentropic ordering of the vacuum surrounding any charge or dipole. As Hestenes puts it, "The electron in the Dirac theory is an emasculated charged particle, stripped of its own electromagnetic field, like a classical test charge. The central problem of quantum electrodynamics... is to restore the electron's field and deduce the consequences. This is the self-interaction problem. Whether, in the ultimate solution to this problem the electron will emerge as a true singularity in the field or some kind of soliton... is anybody's guess. One thing is certain, though, the problem is nonlinear. And if quantization is a consequence of this nonlinearity... then the self-interaction problem can never be solved with standard quantum mechanics; a more fundamental starting point must be found." David Hestenes, "Zitterbewegung in Radiative Process," in The Electron: New Theory and Experiment , David Hestenes and Antonio Weingartshofer, Eds., Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston, 1991, p. 21-36. The quote is from p. p. 33. A potential impact on general relativity and particle physics looms, where at least in theory any spacetime curvature is itself internally structurable by smaller ST curvatures produced to order. Thus precise sets of ST curvatures, or "engines" tailored to perform specific actions on mass, including inside the atomic nuclei, or even inside a nucleon itself, may be possible.
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