If a device needs more power than this then it is

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If a device needs more power than this, then it is considered a self-powered device and will typically have an external power adapter that plugs into a wall outlet. Summary 6:52-7:12 That's it for this lesson. To review, we talked about the Universal Serial Bus, or USB. We talked about how USB works and its limitations. We looked at the different USB versions, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, and 3.1, and we finished by talking about some of the features that USB provides, such as hot-plugging and power. The Universal Serial Bus (USB) is the most commonly used connection interface. Almost every device (e.g., laptops, smartphones, tablets, desktop computers) uses USB in some capacity. USB: Uses serial communication (bits are sent sequentially) Supports plug and play and hot plugging (adding and removing devices without rebooting) Allows up to 127 devices to be connected to a single bus, directly to the host or via hubs (hubs are limited to five tiers) Shares the bandwidth among all devices connected to a single bus Provides 5 V of power through the cable USB has several versions, all of which are backwards compatible. The following table describes the specifications of each version: Version Speed Data Rate Max Cable Length 1.1 Low Speed 1.5 Mbps 3 m Full Speed 12 Mbps 5 m 2.0 Hi-Speed 480 Mbps 5 m 3.0/3.1 SuperSpeed Up to 5 Gbps 3 m SuperSpeed + Up to 10 Gbps 5 m Data transfer rates are limited by the slowest USB version being used. For example, a USB 2.0 device connected to a USB 3.0 port will run at USB 2.0 speeds. USB uses several connector types for various peripheral devices. The following table describes the most common USB connector types: Connector Description Type-A A rectangular connector that generally plugs directly into the computer or a hub. Almost all USB cables have one Type-A connector on one of the ends. Type-B A square connector with two beveled corners. Type-B connectors are mostly used with printers. Some networking devices, such as hubs and modems, also use this connector. Most USB cables that use this connector have a Type-A connector on one end that plugs into the
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computer. miniUSB This connector is used by portable electronic devices, such as digital cameras and some portable storage devices. microUSB microUSB connectors are designed for smartphones and tablet devices. microUSB connectors are approximately half the thickness of miniUSB connectors, making them more appropriate for smaller devices. USB 3.0 introduced several new connector types. The following table describes the connectors used by USB 3.0: Connector Description Type-A The blue tab indicates that the connector is a USB 3.0 Type-A connector and capable of USB 3.0 speeds. USB 3.0 Type-A connectors are backwards compatible with all previous USB versions. Type-B The USB 3.0 Type-B connector is larger in size and designed to carry both data and power. Due to their increased size, USB 3.0 Type-B connectors cannot be plugged into older USB Type-B ports.
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