Tones describing how you stood on the deck on a foggy

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tones describing how you stood on the deck on a foggy winter’s morning and the Statue of Liberty slowly emerged from the dense fog. You told how thrilled you were when all the immigrants on board the shipped burst into cheers upon seeing her for the first time. From New York you moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where two of your mother’s sisters lived. Pittsburgh at this time was a gritty, dirty, steel town where the entry city lay covered in soot. It was like snow, it covered so much of the ground. In Pittsburgh, your father found work in a cotton factory and your found work at the same factory as a bobbin boy, running up and down the long room replacing bobbins and needles for the weavers, six days a week, 9 hours a day for $1.20 a week at the age of 14. You grew restless in this job and seeking more excitement you took a job as a messenger boy. At this time there were no phones, only a telegraph service, but sending a telegraph was expensive, several cents for each word, so most companies, and most people communicated through message service at a local telegraph office. This is where and when you began to work your way to the top. You began to realize that every and any job offered a new and exciting learning experience if you took advantage of it. As a telegraph messenger, you memorized the streets, alleys, and shortcuts of all of Pittsburgh. And, eventhough h you weren’t a telegraph operator, you memorized morse code. As you memorized the streets, you also began to memorize where things were, the theaters, the museums, the libraries, the docks, the factories, the warehouses, everything. Whenever you could, you would stack your deliveries, making sure that any delivery to a theater was left until the end of the day. This way, if you were lucky, and you were often lucky, you would be able to stay and see the show. This is how you became familiar with Shakespeare, Goethe, and other classic plays. You credited these stolen moments of theater with instilling within you a life long love of learning. One of the local theater managers told you of a library run by a progressive factory owner who lent books to working boys. You soon found yourself borrowing as many books as you could, reading everything and anything you could. You began a life long ambition of self-education. You soon found yourself moving up in the telegraph office. You were soon a telegraph operator taking, translating and writing messages. It was in this capacity that you met the man who would make your career, his name was Thomas A. Scott and he was on his way to be a railroad millionaire. He was so impressed with you that he hired you as his personal secretary at a salary that neither you nor your family could believe. So impressed with you, he referred to you as “my boy Andy” and soon you became his right hand man.
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