Velt received more than 57 percent of the popu lar

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velt received more than 57 percent of the popu- lar vote and swept the electoral vote in all but six states. In addition, the Democrats gained 90 seats in the House of Representatives and 13 seats in the Senate to take control of both houses of Congress. Making Generalizations What was Franklin Rooseve l t's campaign strategy in the election of 1932? F. D. Roosevelt Political Affi liat ion Democratic Republican Electoral Popular Votes Votes 472 22,821,857 59 Reg ion What region was the Repub l ican stronghold? How many elec- toral votes went to the Republican candidate, and how many to the Democratic candidate? See Skills Handbook , p. H21 THE NEW DEAL 347
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FACES OF HISTORY ,. -. . · .·· Franklin Delano -. .. ..., .. , ROOSEVELT q- •. · . 1882-1945 ' · ~ ) Raised in a wealthy New York family, Franklin Roosevelt had private tutors and traveled to Europe frequently. He won election in 1910 to the New York State Senate, but he resigned in 1913 to serve as Presi- dent Wilson's assistant secretary of the navy. Roosevelt's career seemed over when he contracted polio in 1921. With the help of his wife, Eleanor, Roosevelt returned to public service. In 1928 he won the race for governor of New York, serving during the early years of the Depression. His work in easing New Yorkers' suffering helped him win the 1932 Democratic presidential nomination. Explain How did Roosevelt's experience in New York help him nationally? 348 CHAPTER l 2 A Political Partnership As a politician, Roosevelt's greatest asset may have been his personality. He had an appeal- ing blend of cheerfulness, optimism, and con- fidence. These qualities were illustrated by his response to the illness that had left him unable to walk without assistance. Rather than giving in to his disability, Roos- evelt had worked tirelessly to regain strength in his legs and to continue his public career. In this era before television, most Americans were unaware of Roosevelt's handicap. How- ever, his personal struggle gave him a strength that many found very reassuring. In this way, Roosevelt took a personal challenge and turned it into one of his greatest political strengths. Roosevelt also possessed a warmth and charm that made him an effective communi- cator. As president, he used the radio to great effect, particularly in his fireside chats. As the name suggests, these addresses were meant to sound as though Roosevelt were in the listen- er's living room, speaking personally with the family. He spoke calmly and clearly and in a way that ordinary people could understand. He conveyed real concern and gave reassurance to millions of troubled Americans. "I never saw him," recalled one Depression survivor, "but I knew him." This ability to help people feel better during their time of hardship won Roosevelt lasting support with voters. Roosevelt's philosophy As you have read, Roosevelt sent some unclear signals during his 1932 presidential campaign. Sometimes he attacked Hoover for not doing enough to fight the Depression-and sometimes for doing too much. At heart, however, Roosevelt was a reform-minded Democrat in the tradition of Woodrow Wilson and
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