Law can afford to more rights to its residents then

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law can afford to more rights to its residents then federal law, but it is not meant to reduce or restrict the rights of a U.S. citizen. Example of conflicts would be the use of Marijuana, where other laws in another area where the federal laws conflict with the state laws. Recreational use is legal in Washington and Colorado. Many other states have legalized medical marijuana. But cannabis continues to be a controlled substance under federal law. Another conflict is Gay marriage. Marriage is and has been traditionally been a state issue. The minimum age requirement to get married varies by state. Marriage licenses are also issued by local governments. Gay marriage is legal in many states. Gay right advocates and opponents of the samesex marriage advocate heavily at the state level. They push the state laws that push their respective agenda. Some states although like California, have had enacted a law to ban gay marriage. This law was deemed unconstitutional by a federal court, and was overturned. The U.S, Supreme Court refused to decide this case when the federal courts decision was appealed. In another case, the Supreme Court recognized the legitimacy of state law and ruled that married samesex couples were entitled to federal benefits. i.e., if a gay couple is married in a state that recognizes samesex marriage, they are to be treated as legally married in their dealings with the federal government. For example, they can file for taxes under the “Married filing jointly” status. References: History.com Staff. (2009). The U.S. Constitution. Retrieved May 18, 2017, from
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[SHORTENED TITLE UP TO 50 CHARACTERS] 3 Khan, S. (2013, October 27). Birth of the US Constitution : Sal Khan : Free Download & Streaming. Retrieved May 17, 2017, from Key Constitutional Concepts. (2011, February 01). Retrieved May 20, 2017, from - concepts&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1
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  • Spring '16
  • Various
  • Computer Science, Supreme Court of the United States, federal law, United States Congress, Federal government of the United States

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