massive data and supercomputing center in Utah apparently with the goal of

Massive data and supercomputing center in utah

This preview shows page 7 - 9 out of 11 pages.

massive data and supercomputing center in Utah, apparently with the goal of intercepting and  storing much of the world’s Internet communications for decryption and analysis, although we  have laws that protect us against government surveillance, secret government programs cannot  be challenged until they are discovered” (Richards, 2013).  It’s one thing if the NSA is mining  data from U.S. citizens, but mining data from across the world?  Professor Richards also makes  the claim that we have laws to protect us (U.S. citizens) from the government surveillance, but  the government will always be hiding things from its citizens, and as long as they keep their  surveillance secretive, it will be deemed “legal.”  The NSA is really pushing their power to the  limits, they are expanding to territories that they are not obligated to expand to.  The NSA is  doing things that in the long run will cause more issues with other countries that the United  States will eventually have to deal with.  If the NSA stops what they are doing now, they might 
Image of page 7
Lakhani 8 be able to prevent serious issues in the future.  If they don’t stop what they're doing, they are  going to cause more and more issues for generations to come. To take a different approach towards the NSA, what if someone was to agree that what  the NSA is doing is acceptable?  Richard A. Epstein, a law professor at New York University  Law School, argues in his article “NSA Surveillance in Perspective” that what the NSA is doing  is somewhat reasonable and not completely wrong.  Of course Professor Epstein starts by  mentioning how the NSA is violating the Fourth Amendment, but then Professor Epstein  mentions something that no other author or scholar has mentioned yet, the Patriot Act.  Professor Epstein explains, “The Patriot Act has set a delicate balance that enables the executive branch to  carry out its basic duty to protect us from another 9/11 while respecting our privacy as much as  possible” (Epstein 2013).  What Professor Epstein is saying is yes, the NSA is invading our  privacy, but its for a good cause.  What the NSA is doing is that they are attempting to make  America a safer place, yes it may include invading our privacy, but it’s at the cost of saving  lives.  Professor Epstein then goes into explaining that the government does not know who you  are speaking to while you are on the phone, they don’t even know the phone numbers of the  people you are calling.  After they receive probable cause, then they file a warrant through a  court before they invade your Fourth Amendment rights.  The big picture that Professor Epstein 
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 11 pages?

  • Winter '08
  • Bill

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture