Where they occur high volume gun trafficking operations are attractive targets

Where they occur high volume gun trafficking

This preview shows page 13 - 14 out of 99 pages.

Where they occur, high-volume gun trafficking operations are attractive targets for regulatory and enforcement eforts . (Certain trafficking routes, such as those supplying firearms to large criminal organizations in Mexico, may behave differently.) Second, new guns are disproportionately recovered in crime, suggesting an important role for close- to-retail diversion of guns in arming criminals . Third, given the diversity of channels through which criminals can acquire guns, law enforcement agencies need to consider a variety of gun trafficking indicators that go well beyond whether a crime gun is recovered with an obliterated serial number or not. Our findings refute three key arguments against the proposition that interventions aimed at curtailing illegal transfers of firearms could be used to good effect in reducing gun availability to criminals and gun crime. The case for a supply-side approach to gun violence is well supported by the empirical evidence on illegal gun market dynamics. To date, however, there is little empirical evidence that such an approach reduces rates of gun crime. We believe that it is time to develop experimental evidence on whether interventions designed to limit illegal transfers of firearms can reduce gun violence. Handguns are the source of the problem Kollmorgen ’16: (SARAH KOLLMORGEN. “Chicago Criminals’ Favorite Gunmakers: A Visual Ranking.” The Trace. January 6, 2016//FT) By early December of last year, the Chicago [PD] Police Department had confiscated 6,521 illegal guns in 2015. That total meant the department was seizing about 19 guns a day — or about one gun every 74 minutes. For the city’s police department, the remarkable haul wasn’t unusual. In 2014, it recovered 6,429. In 2013, it seized 6,815. Indeed, officers in Chicago recover more guns than their counterparts in New York and Los Angeles — two cities with larger populations — combined. In 2012, Los Angeles police seized 122 illegal guns for every 100,000 residents, while New York cops confiscated 39. In Chicago, the rate was 277. Despite having some of the toughest gun regulations of any city in the country, Chicago continues to record thousands of shootings per year. As President Obama has pointed out, that isn’t a failing of the city’s gun laws . The problem is that most of the guns used in crimes in Chicago come from neighboring states with lax gun laws. A study released last year by the city found that almost 60 percent of firearms recovered at Chicago crime scenes were first bought in states that do not require background checks for Internet or gun show sales, like neighboring Indiana and Wisconsin. Of the remaining crime guns, nearly half were purchased at three gun shops just outside the city. Research by the Chicago police and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives paints a detailed picture of how crime guns flow into the city. But less has been known about what kinds of firearms, specifically, are favored by the city’s criminals. In an effort to learn more,
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  • The American, Speak, Firearm, Gun politics in the United States, Gun politics, Gun violence in the United States

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