3 of white students expected to graduate from college

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58.3% of white students expected to graduate from college, while all Asian groups reported higherpercentages, ranging from 67.9% of Southeast Asians, to 84.8% for Japanese and Koreans, up to 95.7%of South Asian students who expected to graduate from college (Goyette & Xie, 1999).Still, problems persist for Asian students:Statistics about Asian American success in school, such as the percentage of Asian American studentsenrolled in college or scoring high on the SAT, are misleading and mask those Asian American studentswho are not doing well. In fact, although it seldom makes news headlines, there is a serious problem ofAsian American school failures (Siu, 1996, p. 1).The challenge for Asian leaders will be convincing political leaders that Asian students do face some of thesame challenges faced by other racial and language minorities.
Further InsightsThe Decline in Minority TeachersThere has been an appreciable decline in the number of minority public school teachers over the pastseveral decades. This is happening even as the percentage of minority students attending public schoolscontinues to set records. The trends are unmistakable:According to the National Institute of Education Statistics (2009), more than 40 percent of students intoday's public schools are minorities, and that number is predicted to increase. Meanwhile, more than 80percent of teachers in public schools are white (National Institute of Education Statistics, 2012).In addition, those teachers of color who do enter the profession are overwhelmingly female ­ male teachersare now only 24 percent of the profession (National Institute of Education Statistics, 2012). MacPherson(2003) quotes then National Education Association President Reg Weaver's concerns that many youngpeople come from fatherless homes, and that "when they're able to have access to a male teacher as afather figure, it certainly bodes well for them, and the same thing with minorities" (as cited in MacPherson,2003, ¶ 4).Statistics show a precipitous decline in the percentage of African­American teachers in public schools. While12.5 percent of public school teachers in 1974 were black (Webb, 1986), that number fell to 6 percent in2003 (MacPherson, 2003). The NEA adds that another 4 percent of public school teachers are other racialminorities. In New York City in 2006­2007, 71 percent of public school students were African­American orHispanic, while 60 percent of their teachers were white (Chung, 2006).Minorities in PrivateIn the 2009­2010 school year, 10 percent of elementary and secondary school students attended privateschools in the United States (Jennings, 2013). Of these students.According to the latest figures from the U.S. Department of Education, private school students receive asuperior academic education:Students at grades 4, 8, and 12 in all categories of private schools had higher average scores in reading,mathematics, science, and writing than their counterparts in public schools. In addition, higher percentagesof students in private schools performed at or above Proficient compared to those in public schools (Perie,

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