They didnt believe in buying time with perry and

This preview shows page 8 - 10 out of 17 pages.

They didn't believe in buying time with Perry and wanted to take a hard stance against the "barbarians." Wanted to fight back and galvanize the nation to create an army, however they lacked a powerful navy to do so. 1853 Kaikoku other leaders in the Bakufu who recognized the need to "buy time" by allowing foreign influence Means "Open the Country." They realized that the geopolitical reality had changed. Instead they wanted to buy time and stall demands by agreeing to small concessions. They would help with ship wrecks and provide food. In return they would ask for technological advancements in order to buy time to help Japan grow stronger. Once Japan is strong then they can fight back. 1853 The Harris Treaty Japan and the US "Treaty of amity and commerce." US was obligated to assume the role of a friendly mediator. The US was the intermediary between the Japanese and other foreign powers (like a buffer). This would keep Japan relatively safe. They would also provide arms sales and advisors. Japan was required to open ports for commerce. Americans were allowed to roam whereever they wanted in Japan without hindrance. Japan also had to accept set tariffs and terrirtorial rights. Both agreed to freedom of religion. 1858 Kanrin Maru The first Japanese steamer. This was manned completely by Japanese sailors. This showed how quickly they were able to get these modern steamers and learn to use them. This was uses to go to the first Japanese delegation in Washington DC 1860 Meiji Restoration 1868 Japan Led to a series of reforms. There was clear opposition to the Bakufu which led to Choshu and Satsuma uprising in the south (1858-1868). This was a massive rebellion in the southern islands. Royalists wanted to reinstate the power of the emperor. In 1868 a boy emperor named Musuhito was installed as emperor. 1868 Fukuzawa Yukichi Prioritized political and social stability, wanted industrial reform without social revolution. Mastermind behind Japan's modernization process. 1835-1901 “Datsu-a” Fukuzawa Yukichi Meaning "leave Asia behind." Fukuzawa's appeal for Japan to focus less on traditions and instead join the club of Western imperialists. late 19th century Changes in samurai status Demise of the samurai as a privileged class as a result of the Meiji reforms. No more sumptuary laws, no right to publicly carry weapons, no more government stipends. But many de-privileged samurais became central to the reforming agenda as they had great incentive to promote change. 8
Who? What? Where? When? Why? (Why is this significant?) Parliamentary Diet House of Nobles plus an elected Lower House. However the emperor still had all executive powers and could dissolve the Diet at will. Japan Constitutional monarchy Japan's new government based on a Lockean model. Legislative powers with the Diet, executive powers with the emperor. Japan Zaibatsus "Industrial corporations" backed by the Meiji government. Labor unions prohibited and all laws tailored to the needs of these industrialists. Japan Meiji tax code Land Tax of 1873. Land assessment for taxation

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture