The Rhetoric of Nuclear Education ERIC DIGESTS reveals the rationale and

The rhetoric of nuclear education eric digests

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The Rhetoric of Nuclear Education:ERIC DIGESTS- reveals the rationale and challenges of “nuclear education” from the point of view of one of its more thoughtful advocates, John Zola.He acknowledges the controversial nature of such curricula and urges teachings to strive for balance in teachingthe subject. Yet he articulates the same (and I would argue false) rationale for developingsuch courses in the first place: that young people are somehow spontaneously fearful of nuclear war, that the fear of nuclear war hangs “like shadows over the young people of this nation,” as Zola puts it.Propaganda in Advertising: Big Tobacco:(pg. 151-158)Vance Packard’s “The Hidden Persuaders” and Wilson Bryan Key’s Subliminal Seduction.oWe talked about how they may have affected our view of the methods and the power of “scientific” advertising.(pg. 318-340)“Pack of Lies”-suggest that the tobacco industry has utilized a variety of unethical and propagandistic techniques to sell cigarettes, especially to children, thereby disputing industry claims that their ads aim only to influence brand preferences among adult smokers.oThe industry for many years tried to defend the claim that tobacco was not a proven health hazard, and they even used “pictures of health” to sell cigarettes- images of beautiful, healthy people smoking while engaged in strenuous physical activities.oExample of ads: Joe CamelPropaganda in Advertising: Sex Sells:Wilson Bryan Key’s assertion that many alcohol and other ads use subconscious appealsto sex to sell their products.Persuasion and Propaganda in Political Campaigns: The Political “Spot” Ad:“The 30-Second Candidate”- gave the historical evolution of spot advertising in political campaigns, from the first televised spot ads aired by Eisenhower campaign in
1952 and the 1964 Daisy ad, to the rapid response, internet, and superPAC ads of recent elections.The interview with Kathleen Jamieson, where we learned about the lessons that politicalconsultants and scholars draw from particular campaigns and reactions to famous spots inpresidential campaign history.oThey often invite “false inferences” as Jamieson likes to say.“Agnew for President”- political ad with an audio track of hysterical laughter.Propaganda and the War Revisited: The Rhetoric of 9/11George W. Bush- we looked at two of his speeches in the days immediately following the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9/11oHis speech to the nation on the night of the attack, and his speech to Congress and the nation on 9/20.oBush’s speech on the night of the attack was designed to eulogize those who died, comfort a grieving nation; assure the nation and the world that the U.S. government would respond appropriately to the attacks. It defined the events of 9/11 as an attack on our “way of life” and began to explain the motives of the terrorists by noting that “we’re the brightest beacon for freedom and opportunity in the world.” He told his listeners that anger was an appropriate emotional response, but not fear, and he

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