Prolactin Prolactin PRL is also called lactogenic hormone As its name suggests

Prolactin prolactin prl is also called lactogenic

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Prolactin Prolactin (PRL) is also called lactogenic hormone. As its name suggests PRL stimulates the growth of the mammary glands and the production of milk after childbirth. As long as the lactating mother continues to breast-feed, PRL levels remain high, and milk is produced. The role of PRL in males is not fully understood but is known to increase the secretion of testosterone. Tropic Hormones The remaining hormones of the anterior pituitary gland are tropic hormones, which are aimed at and control other glands. They include the following: Thyrotropin, or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). The target gland for TSH is the thyroid gland, stimulating it to secrete two thyroid hormones. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH ). The target gland for ACTH is the adrenal cortex, stimulating it to secrete steroids.
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Gonadotropic hormones . The target glands for the gonadotropic hormones are the gonads, or sex glands (ovaries and testes). The two gonadotropins are follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). FSH stimulates the development of ova (eggs) in the female and sperm in the male. LH causes ovulation in the female and causes the secretion of sex hormones in both the male and the female. LH in the male is also called interstitial cell–stimulating hormone (ICSH) because it stimulates the interstitial cells in the testes to synthesize and secrete testosterone. Posterior Pituitary Gland The posterior pituitary gland is also controlled by the hypothalamus, but not through the secretion of releasing hormones. The posterior pituitary gland is an extension of the hypothalamus. It is composed of nervous tissue and is therefore called the neurohypophysis. The two hormones of the posterior pituitary gland are produced in the hypothalamus and transported to the gland, where they are stored until needed. The two hormones are antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and oxytocin Antidiuretic Hormone Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is released from the posterior pituitary gland in an attempt to conserve water. The primary target organ for ADH is the kidney. ADH causes the kidney to reabsorb water from
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the urine and return it to the blood. By so doing, the amount of urine that the kidney excretes decreases—hence, the term antidiuretic hormone ADH is released in response to a concentrated blood (increased osmolarity) and decreased blood volume; both occur in dehydration. The hypothalamic cells that sense the increasing osmolarity of the blood are called osmoreceptors In the absence of ADH, a profound diuresis occurs, and the person may excrete up to 25 L/day of dilute urine. This ADH deficiency disease is called diabetes insipidus and should not be confused with the more common diabetes mellitus, which is an insulin deficiency.
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