Trying to please the world in the way he or she tried

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trying to "please the world" in the way he or she tried to please his or her parents in  childhood. In such cases, people do not carry out consciously planned, rational actions,  but rather fall back on old childhood habits that return automatically. Repression/Suppression Repression and suppression are very similar defense mechanisms. They both involve a  process of pulling thoughts into the  unconscious , and preventing painful or dangerous  thoughts from entering consciousness. The difference is that repression is an  unconscious force, while suppression is a conscious process, a conscious choice not to  think about something. Repression can often be detrimental. Suppression, however, is entirely conscious, and  thus can be managed. Because repression is unconscious, it manifests itself through a  symptom, or series of symptoms, sometimes called the "return of the repressed." A  repressed sexual desire, for example, might re-surface in the form of a nervous cough  or a slip of the tongue. In this way, although the subject is not conscious of the desire  and so cannot speak it out loud, the subject's body can still articulate the forbidden  desire through the symptom. It has often been claimed that traumatic events are "repressed," yet it appears that it is  more likely that the occurrence of these events is remembered in a distorted manner.  One problem from an objective research point of view with this situation is that a  "memory" is usually defined as what someone says or does. It cannot be measured or  recorded objectively, since there is no way to verify the existence and/or accuracy of a  memory except through its correspondence to some other, independent representation  of past events (written records, photographs; reports of others, etc). Normal repression in  psychoanalytic theory  is considered to have two stages, which are progressively involved in the creation of the individual's sense of "self" and "other," of  "good" and "bad," and of the aspects of  personality  called " ego " and " superego ." In the Primary Repression phase, the infant learns that some aspects of reality are  pleasant, and others are unpleasant; that some are controllable, and others not. In order to define the "self," the infant must repress the natural assumption that all things are 
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equal. Primary repression, then, is the process of determining what is self, what is other, what is good, and what is bad. Once done, the child can then distinguish between  desires, fears, self, and mother/other.
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