Empowers and its center story is that of women the

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empowers, and its center story is that of women the film contradicts it and overshadows it by men or by simply cutting a scene. In the most powerful moments, a female character has in the film like the ones I mentioned, Spielberg ruins it by not letting them have their moment, something always as to interrupt. The very last scene with Mister passing by the background ruins the happy moment shared between Nettie and Celie, why does he have to appear? It’s almost like telling the viewer we should feel bad for him and forget about what he did to them because the didn’t separate them again and instead moved along. The scene creates mixed emotions. As stated by Bobo, “The film version of The Color Purple presents a view of Black women that is in direct opposition to these earlier works. The stories told in Black women's novels were a product of a conscious effort to portray multidimensional characters who attempted to attain some measure of control over their lives” (pg. 274). Overall, besides some of these flaws in the film, I can see how some scene Black women can depict and relate to it. Not to mention the film represented scenes that was accurate to that of history. Some powerful scenes shown include Shug singing a blues song she composed specifically for Celie. Another scene is seeing this intimate scene between Shug and Celie where Shug is encouraging Celie to show her smile more often because it’s beautiful that eventually leads to them sharing a kiss. I was quite surprised when this scene was shown. Another beautiful scene is when Shug helps Celie look for her sisters’ letters that Mister had hidden over the years and even offers Celie to hide them in her room for the meanwhile. Also, towards the ending where we finally see Celie speak up for herself and shuts up Mister. Thus, leading her to finally get away from him. An appropriate representation of history we see in the film that most people forget is that many blacks owned black slaves and mistreated them. We see this with Celie’s father who decided to give her away to marriage which lead to her becoming more of a maid and 6
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being sexually abused by her husband. Nevertheless, even though the film has some good scenes to it, it was still overshadowed by its flaws. This film would have lived up to its novel and provided a more powerful meaning if a Black woman had directed it. Unfortunately, around the time of the film’s release strong independent black films weren’t being produced by big Hollywood studios. Bibliography - Diawara, Manthia. Black American Cinema . Routledge, 1993. - Spielberg, S. (Director). (n.d.). The Color Purple [Video file]. Retrieved March 29, 2019, from 7
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  • Summer '17
  • Aminah Bakeer Abdul-Jabbaar
  • White people, Steven Spielberg, Afro-Latin American, Mister

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