a Title A title is important it informs the reader immediately of the main

A title a title is important it informs the reader

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a. Title A title is important – it informs the reader immediately of the main focus of the project, and draws attention to the key issues. b. Definition of the problem Get to the heart of the issue immediately with a clear, accurate and precise definition of the research problem. This was discussed in detail in study unit 3. c. Background of the problem 25
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Marketing Research Theory MRT201 Include some background information about the organisation – its role, aims, responsibilities, mission statement or business strategy, on the external conditions within which the organisation operates – providing an idea of the organisation’s work. Also give background information about the product, service or issue to which the problem relates. d. Why research is necessary State why you think research is necessary and, briefly, how you came to this conclusion e. Statement or research objectives State the research objectives – what it is you want the research to reveal. f. Use of information State what the information will be used for, who will use it and how it will be used. g. Target population Give as much detail as you can about the target audience or the target population. Specify what it is that you want the unit of analysis to be. This information will help the researcher to decide not only on the sampling approach, but also on the type of research and the method of data collection. It will also help to cost the project more accurately. Be as specific and as precise as possible. h. Suggested approach The amount of detail that you give here may depend on your knowledge or research, or on whether you prefer the research supplier to propose ideas that are not influenced by your own. i. Analysis required Set out clearly what type of analysis you need and an idea of the complexity of the analysis that is required. The researcher needs this sort of information in order to make decisions about research design, design of the sample, sample size, type and level or resources to be assigned to the project, time needed to complete it and so on. j. Outputs Data tables, summary reports, full reports and presentation findings are often referred to as ‘deliverables’ or outputs – the products of the research. Typically, they will consist of a presentation of the findings and either a written summary report or a full report, which is handed over at the end of the project. In a qualitative project you may want copies of the videos or audiotapes of the interviews or group discussions and copies of the transcripts, or a summary of the findings from each group. k. Liaison arrangements Set out clearly the contact or liaison arrangements that you want. For example, if you have a project team or advisory group with which the researcher must meet to discuss progress, give details in the brief – frequency of meeting, and type and details of reporting needed – so that the researcher can build this into the work plan and the costing.
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