C can you find p and q exactly why d estimate p and q

Info icon This preview shows pages 3–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
c. Can you find p and q exactly? Why? d. Estimate p and q and interpret each in the context of the problem. e. Estimate how many of the right handed people are homozygous and how many are heterozygous.
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Formulas: p 2 + 2pq + q 2 = 1 p = frequency of the dominant allele in a population p + q = 1 q = frequency of the recessive allele in a population Example problem: In 1990 the East Kentwood High School student body was made up of 90% right handed students. Being right handed (R) is the dominant trait over being left handed (r). a. What is p and q for the population of 1990 East Kentwood High School students. Interpret each. b. Find the percent of the student body in 1990 that are homozygous right handed, heterozygous right handed, and left handed. Fast forward to today at East Kentwood. Mr. V. took a random sample of 100 East Kentwood students today and found that 18 of them were left handed. c. What are the new p and q values? How do they compare with the values from 1990? There are many reasons why this apparent change could have occurred. Come up with an East Kentwood example for each: Small Population Size: Nonrandom Mating: Mutations: Gene Flow: Natural Selection:
Image of page 4
Surface Area to Volume and Water Potential Review 1) Cells throughout the world have variable shapes and sizes. Because of this, and because structure is designed around function, certain shapes are optimal for certain processes. Analyze the following cells (units not to scale), and determine the following… Cell 1 (spherical) where the radius is 3 mm Cell 2 (flat and rectangular) where the height is 0.5mm, length is 4mm, width is 2mm A) What is the surface area to volume ratio of both cells? How to calculate Surface Area? Surface area How to calculate Volume? Volume Surface area to Volume Ratio Cell 1 Cell 2 B) Conclusion: Compare the ratios and explain why one cell would be more efficient than another. C) Are you made of lots of large cells or lots of small cells? Why? How do you actually grow in height? 2) Water potential in potato cells was determined in the following manner. The initial masses of six groups of potato cores were measured. The potato cores were placed in sucrose solutions of various molarities. The masses of the cores were measured again after 24 hours. Percent changes in mass were calculated. The results are shown below. Graph the data to the right of the table. On your graph, label the tonicity of the solution and the cell. Determine the apparent molar concentration (osmolarity) of the potato core cells. Molarity of Sucrose in Beaker Percent Change in Mass 0.0 M 18.0 0.2 5.0 0.4 -8.0 0.6 -16.0 0.8 -23.5 1.0 -24.0
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Looking at the water potential equation, When Solute potential goes down (gets more negative), water potential ____________________ When Pressure potential goes down (gets smaller), water potential ____________________ When would the pressure in a cell rise? (Under what conditions?) Why can only walled cells such as bacteria, fungi and plant cells generate turgor pressure, whereas animal cells cannot?
Image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern