Go through the steps of producing a calculation in

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go through the steps of producing a calculation in order to provide some information about how  different people are seeing the situation. However, the individual decision makers will have to make  decisions based on their own intuitive judgements about what is the right thing to do. Achieving  consensus among a group of decision makers may require extensive discussion that reveals the  goals and beliefs of decision makers to themselves as well as to others. It is easier to identify  emotional distortions in others than in yourself. The discussion, including the exercise of working  through a calculation together, may help the members of a group converge on evaluation of goal  importance and belief plausibility that produce a shared reaction of emotional coherence. A crucial  part of this process is becoming aware of the emotional states of others, which may benefit as much  from face-to-face interactions involving perception of people’s physical communication as much as  from their purely verbal communication.   Improving inferences is both a matter of recognizing good inference procedures, such as informed  intuition, and watching out for errors that people commonly make. Such errors are usually called  fallacies by philosophers and biases by psychologists. Psychologists, philosophers, and economists  have identified a variety of error tendencies in decision making, such as overrating sunk costs, using bad analogies, and being overconfident in judgements. Noticing the role of emotional coherence in  decision-making enables us to expand this list to include emotional determinants of bad decision  making, such as failing to perceive the emotional attitudes of other people.  
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The coherence model of decision-making allows goals to be adjusted in importance while evaluating  a decision, but it does not address the question of how we adopt new goals. Millgrm’s (1997)  account of practical induction is useful for describing how people in novel situations can develop new interests that provides them with new goals. A full theory of decision-making would have to include  an account of where human goals come from and how they can be evaluated. People who have  their decisions only on the goals of sex, drugs, politics etc may achieve local coherence, but they  have much to learn about the full range of pursuits that enrich human lives.
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