Rajni p 172 her poem wreath for a bridal depicts the

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(Rajni p-172). Her poem “Wreath for a Bridal” depicts the picture of joyous marriage ceremony Plath forecasts with Ted Hughes: “Call here with flying colors all watchful birds To people the twigged aisles; lead Babel tonguesOf animal to choir: “Love what thresh of wings Wield guard of honour over there!” Starred with words Let night bless that Luck-rooted mead of cloves Where, bedded like angles, two burn one in fever.” (Wreath for a Bridal 80) In the above lines, SP seems to simply narrate their union as the joyous and ecstatic union of civilized, unmaterialistic and above all selfless creatures full of bliss without any superficiality. Thus, she esteems their marriage to be an ideal one. She was even ready to do anything for the success of her beloved husband—Ted Hughes. Here lies the ambivalence— to be a devoted wife means the sacrifice of a blooming poet lurking with her, which she cannot. Thus her disturb mind echoes “Boys get married, they take a wife. They took marriage for an enlargement, a confirmation of their existence, but not the more right to exist; it is a charge they assume voluntarily. Thus they can inquire
IIUC Studies, Vol. 3 12concerning advantages and disadvantages; for them it is one mode of living, not a preordained lot”. (Beauvoir 1997:449) The poem “The Beast” clearly and vulgarly exposes the beastly nature of a husband. The speaker is so disappointed in her marriage that she stigmatizes the husband: “I have married a cupboard of rubbish.” In the following few lines he “was a bull man earlier/King of my dish, my lucky animal” but consequently becomes “mumblepaws”, “Fido little soul, the bowel’s familiar”. It is not difficult for the readers to guess from her autobiographical hint to her disappointment from her husband Ted Hughes Who is a “Dogsbody” in “Who” and a “Dog-head” devours in “Maenad”. Even her close acquaintances were not free from her ambivalent passion. On occasion we find her a selfless friend while on other occasion she is quite rude and selfish: “I feel the desire to be intensely close to my friends, however the closer I get, the sadder I feel to go away and leave them. (Plath 1975:199). From her biographical writing, The Journal we can explore the complete picture of Plath. She seems not to comply with the friends request rather insist on her own side but still feels a kind of compulsion to oblige at the friends’ request. She was torn with the ambivalent passion. Lameyer, Plath’s friend asserts, “I later, came to feel that Sylvia’s narcissism, a fixation caused at the time of her father’s death, prevented her from loving anyone else fully.” (Lameyer 1977:41) Some more analysis of her relationship with some other close line family members will reveal the sheer quality of her ambivalent nature. One such worth mentioning character is her sister-in-law Olwyn Huges. Sylvia seems like praising and renouncing her at the same time: “A beautiful woman, but extravagant and spendthrift and selfish. She owes Ted 50 dollars. (Plath 1975:287-88)

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