inflammatories such as ibuprofen or naproxen may help for symptoms of headache

Inflammatories such as ibuprofen or naproxen may help

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inflammatories such as ibuprofen or naproxen may help for symptoms of headache, fever, or sore throat (Arcangelo and Peterson, 2013). Non-pharmacological and alternative therapy can be utilized to minimize symptoms. Non-pharmacological interventions may include proper diet, rest, increase fluids, inhale warm moist heat, gargle with salt water, and humidify room air (Arcangelo and Peterson, 2013).
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Alternative therapy includes options such as zinc lozenges, bayberry tea, and aromatherapy rubs (Arcangelo and Peterson, 2013). In a Cochrane Review, it was found that for children older than 1 year of age, the use of honey and throat lozenges were potentially more effective in relieving acute cough than pharmacological interventions (KinyonMunch, 2011). Risk Factor One non-modifiable risk factor a nurse practitioner has to consider when treating a patient with a common cold is a patient's age. Selecting a treatment option to address symptoms associated with the common cold for a pediatric patient be different then an adult patient. OTC cold and cough medications should be avoided in children younger than two years of age (KinyonMunch, 2011). In 2008, after the removal of over-the-counter infant cough and cold medications from pharmacy shelves, the estimated number of emergency department visits for adverse events involving these medications was cut in half for children younger than two years, which resulted in manufactures modifying their product label to state they should not be used in children younger than four years of age (Fashner, Ericson, and Werner, 2012). Oral
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